Linked by David Adams on Fri 18th Jun 2010 19:17 UTC
Linux Linux Magazine has a profile of Daniel Fore and the Elementary project. Elementary is a Linux distro that's committed to a clean and simple user experience, but it's more than a distro - it's actually a multi-pronged effort to make improvements to the user experience for a whole ecosystem of components, including icons, a GTK theme, Midori improvements, Nautilus, and even Firefox. The work that elementary is doing isn't limited to their own distro, and some of their work is available in current, and perhaps future, Ubuntu releases. The results are really striking, and I think it's probably the handsomest Linux UI I've ever seen.
Thread beginning with comment 430623
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
tupp
Member since:
2006-11-12

Dude we all know about apt-get.

It comes with problems like users being unable to upgrade software until system dependency issues have been resolved. Updating an application should not require a major system update.

Dude. Apparently some of us don't know much about apt-get.

Please link a few recent examples of such a problem.

Also, please name an OS that is better at handling program uninstalls.

Edited 2010-06-19 07:46 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26


Please link a few recent examples of such a problem.


Ubuntu 8.04 users were unable to upgrade to OpenOffice 3.0. They were told to upgrade their OS to 9.04 if they wanted the latest version of an office suite. That's retarded. 8.04 was released in 2008.


Also, please name an OS that is better at handling program uninstalls.


OSX. Most the time the uninstaller isn't needed since everything is kept in a single file. But the best implementation of this I have seen is in RISC OS.

Reply Parent Score: 3

tupp Member since:
2006-11-12

Ubuntu 8.04 users were unable to upgrade to OpenOffice 3.0. They were told to upgrade their OS to 9.04 if they wanted the latest version of an office suite. That's retarded. 8.04 was released in 2008.

I'm just going to take your word on this one, because I can't find the problem with a shallow web search and you didn't provide a link.

Yes. That is probably terrible to have to upgrade the whole OS for Open Office. Not having ever had such a problem nor used Ubuntu for more than a few days, I would not know what it entails to upgrade Ubuntu.

However, Ubuntu is only one of hundreds of Linux distros.

Furthermore, what could Open Office 3.0 do that the previous version couldn't?

Also, please name an OS that is better at handling program uninstalls.
OSX. Most the time the uninstaller isn't needed since everything is kept in a single file. But the best implementation of this I have seen is in RISC OS.

Okay. I meant to say "uprgade" not "uninstall."

However, I fail to see how searching for a directory in Finder and then deleting it is superior to or quicker than typing apt-get purge [package] in an already open terminal. I also don't see how the OSX method is better than some GUI package manager -- with a package manager, you know you are removing hidden symlinks and user config files.

Also, Gobolinux has everything in a single directory.

Reply Parent Score: 2

btrimby Member since:
2009-09-30

OSX. Most the time the uninstaller isn't needed since everything is kept in a single file. But the best implementation of this I have seen is in RISC OS.


This works very well for most applications, but for applications that do require an installation package, OS X does *not* provide an uninstall system. Some seemingly simple app bundles will also install a package when they're first run. This works great for those programs, but many (most?) leave behind remnants in /Library when they are drag-to-trash "uninstalled"

As a software engineer who is also responsible for packaging cross-platform per-machine software, I can say that at Apple does not provide a good uninstall mechanism. To make matters worse, they change the installer each release such that build scripts tend to break between releases.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Mac OS X apps
by s_groening on Sun 20th Jun 2010 19:27 in reply to "RE[6]: Rip-offs are news worthy now?"
s_groening Member since:
2005-12-13

Actually, a Mac OS X application typically consists of a number of folders nested within a special folder with the .app extension, which then has specific properties assigned to it, allowing users to double-click on it and have the application run.

Many applications install parts into the /Library/Application Support folder, that you would also have to remove in order to perform a complete removal of the software.

Reply Parent Score: 2