Linked by David Adams on Fri 18th Jun 2010 19:17 UTC
Linux Linux Magazine has a profile of Daniel Fore and the Elementary project. Elementary is a Linux distro that's committed to a clean and simple user experience, but it's more than a distro - it's actually a multi-pronged effort to make improvements to the user experience for a whole ecosystem of components, including icons, a GTK theme, Midori improvements, Nautilus, and even Firefox. The work that elementary is doing isn't limited to their own distro, and some of their work is available in current, and perhaps future, Ubuntu releases. The results are really striking, and I think it's probably the handsomest Linux UI I've ever seen.
Thread beginning with comment 430649
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
jtfolden
Member since:
2005-08-12

There is no so such animal for *ANY* OS


Are you kidding? Virtually everything I install on my Mac is via simple DnD. Virtually every app I run has the ability to download updates and upgrade themselves. All of this going on without having to update the core of the OS every time to do so.



Bullshit.


That scenario is not Bullshit at all. It's quoted verbatim from Ubuntu documentation as an example.

That's because Windows or Mac OS X will require you to run out and spend $$$$ on the latest version of the OS, or buy a freaking new computer.

Don't agree? Try running the latest versions of either VLC or Firefox on Windows 98se for instance. There's quite frankly no reason that I can see for either of these programs to *NOT* run under Win98se except for the fact the the developers wanted to force people to upgrade for no real reason.


Oh, so the latest VLC and FireFox will install without any updates to the OS on Red Hat Linux 5.1, released in 1998?

"There's quite frankly no reason that I can see for either of these programs to *NOT* run under Red Hat Linux 5.1 except for the fact the the developers wanted to force people to upgrade for no real reason." LOL

I will gladly plunk down $99 every 2 years for OS X and not have to worry about installing a whole new version of the OS every 6 months just to have the latest apps. On top of that, I don't have to worry about an unsupported app installing dependencies that screw with the stability of the system.

Reply Parent Score: 2

chris_l Member since:
2010-02-14

"There is no so such animal for *ANY* OS


Are you kidding? Virtually everything I install on my Mac is via simple DnD. Virtually every app I run has the ability to download updates and upgrade themselves. All of this going on without having to update the core of the OS every time to do so.


I will gladly plunk down $99 every 2 years for OS X and not have to worry about installing a whole new version of the OS every 6 months just to have the latest apps. On top of that, I don't have to worry about an unsupported app installing dependencies that screw with the stability of the system.
"


Then you are a frigging fool. Did you not just claim you *DID NOT* have to do this?

Reply Parent Score: -1

jtfolden Member since:
2005-08-12

No, but you must be to think willingly upgrading OS X on my schedule and being able to upgrade apps ANY TIME along the way, independent of that, is somehow equal to being forced to upgrade a distro like Ubuntu every 6 months in order to get the latest apps. It's absurd.

OS X, and even WIndows, offers so much more flexibility and freedom in this area that it's not even funny.

Reply Parent Score: 2