Linked by Kroc Camen on Tue 22nd Jun 2010 12:46 UTC
Amiga & AROS The fabled Amiga X1000 has been spotted in the wild, in the homeliest of places--Station X, a.k.a Bletchley Park. "The AmigaOne X1000 is a custom dual core PowerPC board with plenty of modern ports and I/O interfaces. It runs AmigaOS 4, and is supported by Hyperion, a partner in the project. The most interesting bit, though, is the use of an 500Mhz XCore co-processor, which the X1000's hardware designer describes as a descendant of the transputer - once the great hope of British silicon." With thanks to Jason McGint, 'Richard' and Pascal Papara for submissions.
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axilmar
Member since:
2006-03-20

The Amiga was the first computer to introduce custom chips for graphics and sound. All the other computers followed.

Now that every computer has custom chips for graphics and sound, the Amiga must lead the way once more: it must ditch the concept of custom chips and provide a multicore solution like the X1000!!!!

A multicore solution with 256 or 1024 or 4096 cores, coupled with a language that is automatically parallelizable like Haskell, could be the programmer geek's ultimate dream!

Not only that, but it could lead the way to real time ray tracing graphics...

Reply Score: 2

xiaokj Member since:
2005-06-30

sed s/nuveau/nouveau/g < article?

I agree with increasing the popularity of lisp-like languages to counter the tide of object-orientation.

Didn't know haskell is so automatically parallelisable -- had played with it and I know about the strictness of functional-ness : so much that they had to pretty much invent the convoluted monads to encapsulate IO. No wonder they decided to put in so much effort.

Now, if you want a programming geek's dream computer, it had better come with coreboot + openfirmware + super-multicore + <insert self.likes> + ...

This intrigues me -- if super-multicore + haskell imply the possibility of real time ray tracing graphics, then it also means, with opencl and whatnot, GPU-intensive gaming without lag. Look, ma! 100 fps max settings resident evil! The virus has wrinkles!

Reply Parent Score: 1

Zifre Member since:
2009-10-04

A multicore solution with 256 or 1024 or 4096 cores, coupled with a language that is automatically parallelizable like Haskell, could be the programmer geek's ultimate dream!

I would love to see general purpose chips get to the point that they can replace GPUs. I was really hoping that Intel's Larrabbee would not fail. Just imagine - a world without graphics drivers (all software rendering)! This would make Linux and other alternative operating systems (such as AmigaOS) much more viable for gaming.

Reply Parent Score: 2

biffuz Member since:
2006-03-27

I would love to see general purpose chips get to the point that they can replace GPUs.

Actually, it's GPUs that are becoming general purpose programmable chips :-)

Reply Parent Score: 3

bhtooefr Member since:
2009-02-19

No.

Not even close.

You can even stay in the Commodore family, and there's multiple older examples - C16/Plus-4, C64, VIC-20. (Or, the Atari 8-bit family, if you consider that the Amiga developed from the Atari 8-bits.)

Reply Parent Score: 1

helf Member since:
2005-07-06

The Amiga was the first computer to introduce custom chips for graphics and sound. All the other computers followed.


Uh... no? It had custom chips, yes, but it was far from the first. Gobs of home computers had custom chips for sound and video. Ataris, Commodore VIC and 64, MSX boxes, Tandys, etc etc.

*edit*

woops, bhtooefr beat me to it ;)

Edited 2010-06-23 00:12 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2