Linked by David Adams on Thu 24th Jun 2010 16:21 UTC, submitted by Michael
Games Born out of the demise of Loki Software in 2001 was Linux Game Publishing, but now a decade later the fate of LGP is not looking good for the company that has ported about two dozen game titles to Linux.
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RE: Linux isn't a Desktop OS...
by ssokolow on Thu 24th Jun 2010 17:32 UTC in reply to "Linux isn't a Desktop OS..."
ssokolow
Member since:
2010-01-21

I don't even know where to start. Just about every point you made has been proven false already.

Hardware lag generally isn't a significant issue for hardware other than video cards and if you're using an nVidia video card with the binary driver, not for them either.

There's plenty of evidence that the return on investment for Linux (and Mac) porting is quite high. (Unless your developers are idiots who wouldn't know proper game engine architecture if it bit them on the knows)

Even with those point, Linux users do pay for good games and, when we do, as the Humble Indie Bundle showed, we tend to pay more than our windows-using counterparts.

As for "no other games", that really depends on how you define games. Little arcade things? Plenty of open-source ones, some pretty good. Big 3D shooters? Oh look, Valve is porting Steam and the Source engine and ID Software has been releasing Linux ports of their shooters for ages. Classics? There are plenty of re-implemented engines waiting for the resources on your legally purchased game disc.

As for dual boot, virtualization, and Wine, have you actually used them? There are plenty of people like my brother who would happily buy Linux versions if it meant they didn't have to dual-boot or nag me to figure out how to make Wine play them without screwing up. (Not to mention people like me who specifically buy hardware WITHOUT an OEM license either to save money or because we don't want to line Microsoft's pockets)

The problem with games for Linux is that it's not really economical yet (chicken-and-egg problem) to have the porting studio be a separate company with all the overhead that implies.

Reply Parent Score: 5

deathshadow Member since:
2005-07-12

Hardware lag generally isn't a significant issue for hardware other than video cards and if you're using an nVidia video card with the binary driver, not for them either.


Is that why my Audigy 2 ZS on one machine and my Asus Xonar on another might as well be SB16's so far as linsux is concerned? I have yet to even be able to get 5.1 working out of ANY card I own with Linux... much less things like audio acceleration... Hell, most of the time linux can't even figure out how to kill the speaker output when you plug in the front panel -- GREAT on laptops when you plug in headphones and they either don't work, or if they do the internal speakers are still on. QUALITY.

... and as to video, I didn't buy a pair of 260GTX in SLI to have it perform like a Ge2MX... Ok, that's a bit of an exaggeration, but you get my point. With piss poor support for running resolutions other than what X is set to, no concept of a primary display, etc, etc... Video on linux is a total joke - I can't understand how people can even use that steaming pile of manure as a deskop OS, but less consider it for gaming.

Driver support for both sound and audio are a joke -- much less the total lack of a consistent way for a developer to deploy software without either telling people to compile it themselves (guaranteed way for joe sixpack to tell you to go *** yourself) or releasing specific versions for each and every blasted package method (apt, rpm, etc) and even having to compensate for that one kernel release that BOOM, everythings broken needing a rewrite -- and it's no wonder that the only people who support gaming on linux are the companies that either cookie cutter out using the same framework (UDK for example) or release one game every two years (like Id)

Just the level of support you'd have to provide to let users install the software alone is enough to make it not financially viable unless you charge $100 a copy, much less that the low numbers of target users pushes the expense at all levels.

Frankly, I'm amazed they held on this long.

Edited 2010-06-25 05:18 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26


The problem with games for Linux is that it's not really economical yet (chicken-and-egg problem) to have the porting studio be a separate company with all the overhead that implies.


It's more than a chicken and egg problem.

Linux would have better video card drivers if Linus & Co stabilized the abi and the economics would be better if Linux was a single OS with a standard api and had a software distribution system that wasn't built with the assumption that all user software is open source.

Too bad the ideologists still dominate Linux development. It's pretty obvious that closed source is not going anywhere so maybe it is time to re-think the revolutionary outlook.

Reply Parent Score: 2