Linked by David Adams on Thu 24th Jun 2010 18:30 UTC, submitted by neticspace
Internet & Networking Internet users throughout the world, and particularly in the United States, have long been chastened to hear of South Korea's legendary broadband penetration. The urbanized, technologically-advanced nation has been famous for rolling out ultra high speed network for the majority of its citizens, and many of us have looked on with envy. However, it turns out it's not all good news. An OSNews reader gives us the skinny from the trenches in Korea.
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RE: Messy article
by ElCabri2 on Fri 25th Jun 2010 13:57 UTC in reply to "Messy article"
ElCabri2
Member since:
2009-03-11

Actually yes we should, because all of these shiny "fiber for everyone" infrastructure actually _originate_ in over-involvement of the government in the internet policies. One comes with the other. It's good sometimes to point out the flip side of the coin.

After all the whining that's been going on for ten years about ISPs in the US, the fact is that we still have the most innovative, free as in speech internet.

Let them have online gaming as a national pastime, and let's keep the worldwide online media stores, let's keep setting standards, directions and initiatives for digital content, social applications and mobile OSs.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Messy article
by Wintermute on Fri 25th Jun 2010 16:31 in reply to "RE: Messy article"
Wintermute Member since:
2005-07-30

That's bullshit, US ISPs are extremely uncompetitive and rely on what amounts to corruption along with agitprop about freedom and other such stupid tactics.

Even here in Ukraine, I pay what amounts to $25 for a24mbit downn/3mbit up line. While the up part is kind of weak, I dare you to find a similar deal in the US. When I lived in Ann Arbor, MI (one of the best connected cities in the US by a recent survey), I had to pay a whopping $66 dollars for 8bit down line from Comcast. I'd imagine a 24mbit line would approach $100 dollars. And I am not even talking about their constant cheating where they would inflate my bill and constant spam calls asking to me upgrade.

While the wireless industry is more developed investment-wise than in Ukraine, the prices were out of his world. Everything was done to make you sign a contract with as many additional plans as possible. Mass market collusion where prices for an individual sms was always identical among the top 4 providers. Heavy device lock in, $500 contract cancellation fees, $1.99 for clicking on internet by accident, the list can go on and on...

So drop the corporate cheerleading. It's not like your getting paid for it.

Edited 2010-06-25 16:34 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Messy article
by Moochman on Sat 26th Jun 2010 08:43 in reply to "RE: Messy article"
Moochman Member since:
2005-07-06

After all the whining that's been going on for ten years about ISPs in the US, the fact is that we still have the most innovative, free as in speech internet.


Yeah, gotta disagree on this one. First of all, "we" don't have anything, the whole world with a few exceptions contributes and is able to take advantage of innovation on the internet. Yes, most of the big web platform companies are based in America, but it's because of a range of factors, definitely *not* because U.S. infrastructure is better. Better than some places, yes. But imagine if we had South Korea-level broadband! You can bet that innovation would take off like a rocket then....

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Messy article
by Laurence on Sat 26th Jun 2010 11:12 in reply to "RE: Messy article"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

After all the whining that's been going on for ten years about ISPs in the US, the fact is that we still have the most innovative, free as in speech internet.


That's really not true. While the US might not have firewalls like China or even the arguably justified filters against child porn that France has, the US is still pretty bad for allowing corporations to constantly sensor information they do not like.

Whether it be Apple shutting down unofficial websites or the DMCA chasing after torrent sites, US corporations are constantly using their money to exert control over online content.

And lets also not forgot the damage that one US company had single handedly done with it's stagnated versions of IE.

So yeah, officially the US internet is open to free speech. But in practice it doesn't always work out that way.

Reply Parent Score: 2