Linked by Kroc Camen on Sat 26th Jun 2010 10:48 UTC
Internet Explorer Microsoft have released IE9 Platform Preview 3, an application that gives developers access to the IE9 rendering engine (it's not a full browser). In this update they have added hardware accelerated HTML5 Video, Canvas, Fonts (using WOFF) and big improvements in JavaScript with ES5, DOM Traversal, L2 and L3 events and 83/100 Acid3 score. It sits between Firefox and Chrome 6 on JavaScript speed, but outperforms every browser in real tests.
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Not to be persnickety
by tbutler on Sat 26th Jun 2010 16:07 UTC
tbutler
Member since:
2005-07-06

But I always have meant to ask. Why do you talk of companies like Microsoft and Apple using plural verbs instead of the standard (in English, that is) of singular verb? E.g. "Microsoft has..."

It always sounds odd when I see "Microsoft have" or "Apple were" here on OSNews. :-)

Edited 2010-06-26 16:08 UTC

Reply Score: 2

RE: Not to be persnickety
by Thom_Holwerda on Sat 26th Jun 2010 16:38 in reply to "Not to be persnickety"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

I would think t3h int4rweb would know by now that there are two main branches of English today (en-gb and en-us).

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Not to be persnickety
by Tuishimi on Sat 26th Jun 2010 16:45 in reply to "RE: Not to be persnickety"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

And everyone knows that GB-ers drive their cars on the wrong side of the road, too. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Not to be persnickety
by tbutler on Sat 26th Jun 2010 19:29 in reply to "RE: Not to be persnickety"
tbutler Member since:
2005-07-06

It is just an odd notation when referring to things as impersonal as large corporations. The singular collective usage seems to be more frequent than plural collective in most British books and publications I read. More interestingly, I've noticed OSNews will sometimes vary its usage within a given article, which makes it stand out more.

Typically a collective plural verb seems to be best applied when trying to emphasize the individuals within the collective.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Not to be persnickety
by nt_jerkface on Sun 27th Jun 2010 14:35 in reply to "RE: Not to be persnickety"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Classic British English or some new bastardized form?

Try finding an old British headline that reads Germany have invaded Poland.

Single organizations use the singular form.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Not to be persnickety
by Eddyspeeder on Sat 26th Jun 2010 17:15 in reply to "Not to be persnickety"
Eddyspeeder Member since:
2006-05-10

The use of "Microsoft have" rather than "Microsoft has" is because of the way collective nouns are treated. Read this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_and_British_English_differenc...

The logic is that you wouldn't refer to Microsoft saying, "He has released IE9PP3." Instead, you would say, "They have released IE9PP3." The British take it one step further. They stick to the plural sense at all time, out of consistency:
"[The people who develop IE] have released IE9PP3."
"[They] have released IE9PP3."
"[Microsoft] have released IE9PP3."

Or in short, every time you refer to something that describes several people, even when the noun is singular (band, corporation, team, gang, fanclub, OSNews), you can treat it as plural. So, OSNews have done well. Kroc has done well.

______________
EDIT: I accidentally wrote "He have released IE9PP3." in the example line. So much for confusion! Haha.

Edited 2010-06-26 17:17 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: Not to be persnickety
by tbutler on Sat 26th Jun 2010 22:50 in reply to "RE: Not to be persnickety"
tbutler Member since:
2005-07-06

The neuter form is one of the strange parts of English. I suspect "they" is often used since most people seem to prefer it to "it" or the "generic masculine." Hence, people will speak of a singular person using "they" if they do not wish to specify a gender -- even though that is incorrect.

Probably the best usage would be "Microsoft has announced... It will make the updates available..."

Interestingly, surveying the BBC, they are inconsistent in usage. I found some variation even within a single piece. Sloppy.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Not to be persnickety
by nt_jerkface on Sun 27th Jun 2010 14:24 in reply to "RE: Not to be persnickety"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Or in short, every time you refer to something that describes several people, even when the noun is singular (band, corporation, team, gang, fanclub, OSNews), you can treat it as plural. So, OSNews have done well. Kroc has done well.

OSNews is a single organization and should be treated as such.

OSNews has done well this year.

Great Britain has lost an empire and has not yet found a role.

Reply Parent Score: 2