Linked by David Adams on Thu 1st Jul 2010 08:52 UTC
GNU, GPL, Open Source The HURD was meant to be the true kernel at the heart of the GNU operating system. The promise behind the HURD was revolutionary -- a set of daemons on top of a microkernel that was intended to surpass the performance of the monolithic kernels of traditional Unix systems and in doing so, give greater security, freedom and flexibility to the users -- but it has yet to come down to earth.
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RE[5]: Reason Linux lives:
by phoenix on Fri 2nd Jul 2010 23:49 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Reason Linux lives:"
phoenix
Member since:
2005-07-11

"Red Hat invested quite a bit in Linux and then Oracle came along and offered support for RHEL at half price. This actually caused their stock to drop a while back.

What a truly splendid business. A company like Red Hat invests in Linux and a massive corp like Oracle can come along and undermine their profits without improving the software.

But this only proves my point. Oracle CAN do like this with Linux. It would not be possible to do like this with Apple OS X or Windows. This possibility is the sole reason Linux attracts lots of business people: you can easily make money out of Linux.
"

Nope, that has nothing to do with your point, which that this applies only to Linux and not to FreeBSD. There was no mention of MacOS X or Windows in your original posts.

However, there's nothing stopping people from doing for Windows/MacOS X what Oracle did for RHEL. In fact, there are tonnes of businesses out there that provide support for MS/Apple products at lower prices than Microsoft.

You just brand it as a package and sell it.


How is that any different from any other industry? Just look at the soft drink industry. Sure, when you walk down the aisle you see multiple brands (Coke, Pepsi, PC Cola, Safeway brand, Craigmont Cola, etc). However, if you look closely, you'll find that most of the "store brands" are just Coke or Pepsi re-branded and sold a lower price, with just a few tweaks to the recipe.

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