Linked by vodoomoth on Fri 2nd Jul 2010 09:03 UTC
Opera Software Opera 10.60 has been released July 1 for Mac OS X and is available for download. The features highlighted on the changelogs page are: layout engine (codename 'Presto'), HTML5 with support for offline web applications, WebM, which has been available in Opera (in a special build) on the very day of the announcement at the Google I/O conference, web workers for running scripts in the background without impeding the browsing experience, and geolocation. Version 10.60 is also available for Windows and Linux/BSD.
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joekiser
Member since:
2005-06-30


Still you're missing the point. The point is not that opera adds itself to apt and tells the system that I trust their repo with all my packages, but that it does so without my explicit permission. If you really can't see this difference and the gravity of their actions I don't think there is any point in continuing this discussion.)


But if Opera were to design their own glibc and serve it through the repo, wouldn't the package manager tell you there is a conflict and ask what you want to do when updating? I don't know apt that well, but this seems to be the case with yum and pacman. If the package system is overwriting packages with similar names and no user input, that is a design problem with apt, not Opera.

All of this is purely speculative, btw. If you don't want Opera messing with system files, stop running everything as root. The FreeBSD version of the 10.6 beta gave me the option to install in my ~/ directory.

Reply Parent Score: 2

msundman Member since:
2005-07-06

"The point is not that opera adds itself to apt and tells the system that I trust their repo with all my packages, but that it does so without my explicit permission. If you really can't see this difference and the gravity of their actions I don't think there is any point in continuing this discussion.)


But if Opera were to design their own glibc and serve it through the repo, wouldn't the package manager tell you there is a conflict and ask what you want to do when updating? I don't know apt that well, but this seems to be the case with yum and pacman. If the package system is overwriting packages with similar names and no user input, that is a design problem with apt, not Opera.
"

No. If opera software serves a package with the same name and a higher version number then the existing (official) package will be replaced by that package during the next update. It's not overwritten, but replaced as if there was a newer one on the official repo. Of course you could put some filters in the apt-preferences to limit what kind of packages are installed/upgraded from opera's repo, but opera doesn't do.

However, you are right in that the (pre|post)(inst|rm)-scripts are a design flaw in apt, and it's those that opera use to do its shenanigans. Still, opera software wasn't forced to do what they did like they did, they chose it.

Reply Parent Score: 2