Linked by David Adams on Wed 7th Jul 2010 19:09 UTC
Apple A Forbes article notices that while the iPad's reception from the public and the mainstream press has been overwhelmingly positive, the prevailing sentiment among some alpha geeks has been negative to the extreme. The conclusion, of course, is that these people aren't reacting to what the iPad is, but rather what it represents: a violation of the ethos of the personal computer. The author of the Forbes article concludes that much of the anti-iPad vitriol is hyperbole, and doesn't help advance the cause. It's a thought-provoking question.
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RE[4]: Forbes
by lordepox on Thu 8th Jul 2010 18:47 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Forbes"
lordepox
Member since:
2010-04-14

Microsoft had done stranger things than killing .NET... I still personally won't use it. I don't care if it's faster, it's not portable enough (different versions of the tinting on different windows platforms) and overall it's a bit buggy sometimes. Anyone who ever used version 1.0 will know what I mean (the infamous unknown error has occurred). The might decide tomorrow that they're new XYZ is better and make everyone use that with an interpreter in between for
Legacybsruff.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Forbes
by lordepox on Thu 8th Jul 2010 18:48 in reply to "RE[4]: Forbes"
lordepox Member since:
2010-04-14

And that's what I get for writing a reply on an iPhone. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Forbes
by nt_jerkface on Thu 8th Jul 2010 19:22 in reply to "RE[4]: Forbes"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Anyone who ever used version 1.0 will know what I mean (the infamous unknown error has occurred).


LOL version 1.0? When did that come out? Try paint.net or the Zune software for a better assessment.


The might decide tomorrow that they're new XYZ is better and make everyone use that with an interpreter in between for Legacybsruff.


Half the point of .Net is to keep it independent of any changes in Windows. You can also run .Net apps in Windows with Mono so there is really no cause for concern.

MS uses .Net to keep developers on their platform which in turn keeps consumers and businesses buying Windows. It's laughable to suggest that they might move away from it anytime soon given its success. If anything they will ditch Win32 but that would be far into the future.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Forbes
by Tuishimi on Thu 8th Jul 2010 20:11 in reply to "RE[4]: Forbes"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

You mean like supporting Win32 for umpteen bajillion years?

Reply Parent Score: 2