Linked by David Adams on Sun 11th Jul 2010 19:43 UTC
Microsoft U.K. government staff suggested replacing Microsoft Corp. operating systems on computers with free alternatives in response to a call for ideas for Prime Minister David Cameron's cost-cutting drive.
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Bill Shooter of Bul
Member since:
2006-07-14

Open Office, in addition to being open source itself, is also based on Open standards. Thus you have Koffice, Gnome Office Suite, and others writing to that same standard for file formats. Those are not being written by Oracle and are continuing to improve.

Just like HTML wasn't doomed by Mozilla's code base, ODF's wouldn't be doomed by Open Office's. That's one of he great benefits of open standards, and one of the biggest reasons to *not* use MS Office.

But yes, there is a dearth of good quality Accounting software on Linux. But that is mainly due to the monopoly Quick books has on all platforms. Every small business I work with uses it.

If only there were some way to use it through an industry standard for rendering a markup language capable of hyper-link technology through a vast network of interconnected computers. This "information super-highway" of a network might allow this accounting information to be utilized in a variety of places on a variety of platforms, rendering it more valuable to small businesses than a self contained installation.

Oh well, I guess that's just a crazy dream I had due to too much late night guacamole.

Or maybe not...
http://quickbooksonline.intuit.com/finance-accounting-solutions/

Reply Parent Score: 2

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Open Office, in addition to being open source itself, is also based on Open standards. Thus you have Koffice, Gnome Office Suite, and others writing to that same standard for file formats. Those are not being written by Oracle and are continuing to improve.


Continuing to improve yes but as of today KOffice and Gnome Office are not adequate alternatives to MS Office.


But yes, there is a dearth of good quality Accounting software on Linux. But that is mainly due to the monopoly Quick books has on all platforms. Every small business I work with uses it.


They don't have a lock on the market though. The problem is that there is a lack of open source developers that want to work on accounting software.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

I agree Koffice and Gnome Office are not as mature as Open office, but they do represent an open source community led effort to develop office software that absolutely can read & write the same files as Open Office, with perfect fidelity. In the event of a Oracle meltdown, it may be easier for companies to inject money/developers in these projects. Just as khtml was chosen as a base by Apple, rather than Mozilla. We've got options, I'm saying. Not every egg is in Open office.

I can only speak form my experience working with small businesses, but Quickbooks tends to dominate in the space. It would be very difficult for any other Accounting software to dislodge it: open or closed source, due to the difficulty in migrating data. In any case, its available on line now. So, it can be used on Linux.

Reply Parent Score: 2

sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

Continuing to improve yes but as of today KOffice and Gnome Office are not adequate alternatives to MS Office.

You can't have it both ways. First you say people are "locked in" to OpenOffice, which is not true since the code base is not provided by only one vendor. Then when it is pointed out that OpenOffice uses standard formats that are supported by other programs you say "But they're not as good." Well, buster, you're right! But the fact remains that if some evil Oracle plot were to make OpenOffice unusable tomorrow without paying a huge fee any government with thousands of ODF files... would still be able to read those documents.

Now, maybe the formatting would not be perfect tomorrow but compatibility would improve over time and, importantly, there would be zero down time while you desperately try to get someone to pony up the cash for the now-pay OpenOffice.

But let's not even walk down this fantastic avenue. If Oracle were to close off OpenOffice development tomorrow and decree "StarOffice only from now on," what would be the effect? Diddly-squat! The Go-OO people would smoothly take over; meanwhile, mirrors of the source and binaries exist already. The existing and future users would still have a license under the same terms as now. Oracle can go and fuck themselves however they like, we don't need them. We are not locked in to them. They simply *can't* prevent the free use of OpenOffice, even if they wanted to.

So, our government which uses OpenOffice keeps using it and meanwhile compatible software is improved. When they feel like it they switch again.

Reply Parent Score: 3