Linked by David Adams on Tue 13th Jul 2010 16:48 UTC, submitted by diegocg
Sun Solaris, OpenSolaris This morning, at the OpenSolaris Governing Board (OGB) meeting, the following was proposed and unanimously resolved: "The OGB is keen to promote the uptake and open development of OpenSolaris and to work on behalf of the community with Oracle, as such the OGB needs Oracle to appoint a liaison by August 16, 2010, who has the the authority to talk about the future of OpenSolaris and its interaction with the OpenSolaris community otherwise the OGB will take action at the August 23 meeting to trigger the clause in the OGB charter that will return control of the community to Oracle."
Thread beginning with comment 433393
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Shame for great technology
by gnufreex on Tue 13th Jul 2010 17:54 UTC
gnufreex
Member since:
2010-05-06

Sun dug a hole where OpenSolaris will be buried. It is called CDDL. GPL hate and incompatibility destroyed another great technology. When will people learn that GPL is only license which makes your open source project immune to hostile takeover?

Reply Score: 2

lucas_maximus Member since:
2009-08-18

BSD license?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Shame for great technology
by Rahul on Tue 13th Jul 2010 18:32 in reply to "Shame for great technology"
Rahul Member since:
2005-07-06

GPL license wouldn't have mattered at all in this case. Sun didn't manage to get a diverse community of contributors for OpenSolaris and insisted on centralized copyright control. Oracle made the situation worse by not following up on promises to the OpenSolaris community and maintaining stone cold silence in response to the OpenSolaris Governance Board making them effectively useless. When a single vendor has such a strong hold on the project, copyright license is least of their worries. OGB is recognizing the fact that they have become mute powerless spectators and taking the right action.

Reply Parent Score: 7

gnufreex Member since:
2010-05-06

Ok, that too. Control freakishness of Sun had a play there, but if license was GPL (or at least GPL-compatible, like BSD) then a lot of people would get interested in technology, community would get bigger and Oracle would have two choices: keep OpenSolaris going, or let it go and watch people fork it. GPL forces dictatorship to be benevolent.

So Sun used "phuck you Linux" license and even sent their evangelists to talk how CDDL is "more Free" than GPL. That created bad faith and lot of people refused even to look at OpenSolaris code. For example, look what Linux kernel developers said when OpenSolaris was opensourced. Nobody was going to look at it.

Another example, Debian guys thought about making Debian GNU/sunos - SunOS kernel with GNU user-land - but when they read CDDL, they decided to go with FreeBSD kernel and make Debian GNU/kFreeBSD port. If Debian GNU/Sunos was created, that would lead to lots of bug-fixes and QA for sunos kernel.

Reply Parent Score: 2

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

GPL license wouldn't have mattered at all in this case. Sun didn't manage to get a diverse community of contributors for OpenSolaris and insisted on centralized copyright control. Oracle made the situation worse by not following up on promises to the OpenSolaris community and maintaining stone cold silence in response to the OpenSolaris Governance Board making them effectively useless. When a single vendor has such a strong hold on the project, copyright license is least of their worries. OGB is recognizing the fact that they have become mute powerless spectators and taking the right action.


Even so, OpenSolaris was still hugely reliant on Sun for key parts of the operating system which 'Project Emancipation' was meant to 'emancipate' OpenSolaris from Sun but never went anywhere. OpenSolaris is still reliant on Oracle and until those closed source binaries are fully replaced OpenSolaris will never be truly free. It is disappointing that the opening of Solaris started with such a hiss and a roar - here it is now stuck in a quagmire.

In all honesty it is absolutely pathetic, the last post to emancipation mailing list was December 2009 - it really goes to show that rather than Sun actually ever having their heart into transforming Solaris into a truly open source community they seem to have turned the internet as a dumping ground for a product they seem to have lost interest in developing years ago. It is really depressing that something I saw as a possible alternative to the Linux hegemony has crashed and burned so quickly.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: Shame for great technology
by AndrewZ on Tue 13th Jul 2010 19:31 in reply to "Shame for great technology"
AndrewZ Member since:
2005-11-15

Sun dug a hole where OpenSolaris will be buried. It is called CDDL. GPL hate and incompatibility destroyed another great technology. When will people learn that GPL is only license which makes your open source project immune to hostile takeover?

This kind of crazy hippie talk makes baby unicorns cry. It's nonsense really.

The fact is that Open Solaris was an corporate experiment that failed. Open sourcing Solaris failed to create enough paying users to make it worth the effort. it did not even appreciably increase market share. These are probably concepts that you are not familiar with: profits and market share. Look them up on wiki. If Solaris was open sourced with GPL3 (God forbid even the idea!) it would not have changed history.

Oracle is now taking a much less tolerant attitude. All these unprofitable Sun projects will now come to an end. They serve no purpose for Larry Ellison's shareholders. Open Solaris will now be rolled up with little fanfare. That is all. Good day.

Reply Parent Score: 6

gnufreex Member since:
2010-05-06

You are not familiar with fact that open source can generate profits, it does so for Red Hat and many others. Even for Oracle.

If Sun decided to opensource Solaris, they should have done it properly, or not do it. OpenSolaris was failed experiment because they didn't do it properly. And even though they didn't do it properly, even though Sun didn't take advantage of all benefits of open source (they took advantage of free redistribution and bug reports by non paying users, but didn't expand development community and accelerated development) , OpenSolaris managed to stop decline of Solaris for certain period of time. At least until financial crisis hit.

If they didn't open source it, it would be dead OS by now, and Sun would be even cheaper buy for Oracle.

If they opensourced it under GPLv3, it would certainly helped to reduce development costs and increase pace of innovation. But it might not have helped to save company because Sun lost money on hardware, and software support revenue couldn't supplant that. You could argue that writing on the wall was since year 2000. But at least in that case OpenSolaris would live on.

This way, both Sun and OpenSolaris are dead.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Macrat Member since:
2006-03-27



The fact is that Open Solaris was an corporate experiment that failed. Open sourcing Solaris failed to create enough paying users to make it worth the effort. it did not even appreciably increase market share.


It didn't help when Sun Sales wouldn't return calls of companies who had been running OpenSolaris and wanted to buy license and support.

Sun Sales ignored these potential customers because they weren't considered big enough to matter.

Leaving money on the table was clearly a sign that Sun was going down.

Reply Parent Score: 4