Linked by David Adams on Fri 16th Jul 2010 19:46 UTC, submitted by aaronb
OSNews, Generic OSes The folks at WineHQ have released the second major stable version of Wine: "This release represents two years of development effort and over 23,000 changes. The main highlights are the support for 64-bit applications, and the new graphics based on the Tango standard. It also contains a lot of improvements across the board, and over 3,000 bug fixes."
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RE[6]: WOOHOO!
by visconde_de_sabugosa on Mon 19th Jul 2010 14:01 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: WOOHOO!"
visconde_de_sabugosa
Member since:
2005-11-14

Writing apps for Windows is considerably easier, considerably more documented and the wealth of APIs and frameworks dwarfs whatever Linux has (especially because some of the few good Linux libraries are also


But if it is so difficult program for linux, how can you explain the availability of hundreds of thousands free applications for linux, most made by amateurs ?

I have no doubt that if traditional software houses ported their applications to linux and other platforms only being careful of using multiplatform APIs and libraries, linux would be much more popular.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[7]: WOOHOO!
by siride on Mon 19th Jul 2010 15:05 in reply to "RE[6]: WOOHOO!"
siride Member since:
2006-01-02

"Writing apps for Windows is considerably easier, considerably more documented and the wealth of APIs and frameworks dwarfs whatever Linux has (especially because some of the few good Linux libraries are also


But if it is so difficult program for linux, how can you explain the availability of hundreds of thousands free applications for linux, most made by amateurs ?
"
You know there are hundreds of thousands of free apps for Windows, too, right? And a bunch of them are open source, too.

Of course, it's easy to put together a hello world app on pretty much any platform. Serious applications are something else. While Qt and to a lesser extent GTK are pretty decent APIs, they really only cover a core of functionality. The Windows development platform has a huge range of APIs, if not documented well by MSDN (and let's face it, MSDN often sucks), they are documented by a plethora of books and online resources.

I've done development on both Linux and Windows and working on the latter is considerably easier and more powerful. The tools for it are much better. The platform is much richer. And you know what? It actually works. And I can deploy apps easily to an array of machines and they work! Well, you have to do some work, of course, but it's nothing like the disaster that is different Linux distros or even versions of distros.

I have no doubt that if traditional software houses ported their applications to linux and other platforms only being careful of using multiplatform APIs and libraries, linux would be much more popular.

Those APIs would have to exist, would have to work and Linux would have to support them.

But also, why? What huge desktop market do these vendors hope to gain traction in by having their apps work on Linux, which is no easy task for real applications (and not the hundreds of thousands of two-bit, buggy, crashy apps that you mention above)? There is almost no value in porting to desktop Linux. And even if they do, their apps won't run as well and won't look as nice and this will not reflect well on them. It's really just not worth it.

Until some distro or consortium gets serious about making a standardized, well-thought out API that is supported by corporations and not basement coders, and that covers not just making simple apps, but all of the other things that real applications need, that the Windows API provides, then nobody is going to care about Linux. And even then, for most people, why switch to Linux when you can use already working Windows or Mac?

I mean, seriously, what is ever going to be the draw for Linux on the desktop? What, besides freedom, will it do better than Windows or Mac? Remember, regular users don't care about the GPL or software patents. And for them, Windows is practically free as well, so the cost issue isn't going to win them over either.

Face it, Linux on the desktop is a non-starter. It will remain a niche for geeks and occasionally used to roll out kiosk computers. Why try to make it anything else?

Reply Parent Score: 2