Linked by David Adams on Wed 21st Jul 2010 15:14 UTC, submitted by shaneco
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Early takes on the Technical Preview of Windows Phone 7 are more thumbs up than screw up. But is it too late to sway users?
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DonnyEMU
Member since:
2007-01-29

You don't run the same apps on desktop linux as you do on the phone (even android) there is a screen real-estate question.. The same goes for Windows Phone 7... However both platforms each use the same development tools and frameworks, respectively of course..

In fact Windows Phone 7 is based on the portable .NET framework we all know as Silverlight. So any Silverlight app (including out of browser ones) can easily be ported. Silverlight and Windows 7 (WPF) apps have a lot in common thanks to screen layouts in XAML..

So this Windows Phone 7 is not Windows 7 desktop OS is true, it doesn't really need to be.. The lightweight kernel of the .NET compact framework sits below it giving it a one two punch, and the same web apps in silverlight can easily run in Windows 7 desktop or Windows Phone 7..

Just as XNA games on Windows Desktop and X-Box 360 can easily (with screen considerations) run great on Windows Phone 7..

So get over these comments as porting is even easier and tools like Expression Blend 4 for Windows Phone 7 are much better tools than Interface Builder on the Mac (for iPhone) or what comes standard in the Android SDK (including googlelabs app inventor) and EASIER and have true design imports (like photoshop and illustrator)..

Also, C# is much easier to code in and takes a lot less code to do the same thing in Objective C or C++ so it takes less time and costs less to port an app. Plus Microsoft's cloud solutions and support for enterprise intfrastructure to support them are already in place at most firms, versus iPhone or Android..

So get over trying to pan a product that isn't even released yet.. Microsoft doesn't have to wow people they never have been the leader with that anyway..

They have to support enterprise, come out with a more cost-effective solution that is easier to develop for and has better looking and working apps..

In my opinion they've done all of that, and you are probably really haven't taken a good look at what they are going to be offering if you think otherwise..

Reply Parent Score: 5

vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26

The lightweight kernel of the .NET compact framework sits below it giving it a one two punch, and the same web apps in silverlight can easily run in Windows 7 desktop or Windows Phone 7..


One two punch? Are you reading this from some marketing brochure? ;-)

Also, C# is much easier to code in and takes a lot less code to do the same thing in Objective C or C++ so it takes less time and costs less to port an app.


Ease of coding comes from the libraries, languages are mostly equivalent, with C# having a slight edge (with closures etc). The killer with C# & silverlight is that the code you write is proprietary microsoft-only code - if your product doesn't "make it", you have intellectual property of zero value at your hands. You could argue the same for ObjC, but iPhone is already popular so the risk is lower.

What's interesting with windows phone 7 is the ui design. You'd never had expected Microsoft to aim at such simple & clean look.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Panajev Member since:
2008-01-09

Well, with iOS4, Objective-C supports blocks (and GCD) on the iPhone too so that's a wash in terms of closures.

Also, Objective-C has improved considerably over the past few years (having moved, for 64 bit OS X apps and all iOS 4.x apps, to a single unified runtime for simulators and devices).

http://www.mcubedsw.com/blog/index.php/site/comments/new_objective-...

Objective-C 2.2, even without GC on the iPhone and the iPad, is quite cool ;) .

Reply Parent Score: 1

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

The killer with C# & silverlight is that the code you write is proprietary microsoft-only code - if your product doesn't "make it", you have intellectual property of zero value at your hands.


There's an investment risk with any platform.

Anyways if you use XNA you can also target Windows and the 360. There is also MonoTouch and MonoDroid is in the works.

Android's Java is actually incompatible with standard Java so I'm really not seeing a disadvantage for mobile .net developers.
http://apsblog.burtongroup.com/google_android/

Reply Parent Score: 2

JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

They have to support enterprise, come out with a more cost-effective solution that is easier to develop for and has better looking and working apps..

In my opinion they've done all of that, and you are probably really haven't taken a good look at what they are going to be offering if you think otherwise..


Yeah, but they aren't targeting the enterprise market with WinPho7, for the enterprise WinMo is still there. WinPho7 is there to take on iPhone(the consumer market).

Reply Parent Score: 2