Linked by gsyoungblood on Tue 20th Jul 2010 18:01 UTC
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless On July 15th the latest Android super-phone was released by Motorola and Verizon Wireless. All hail the Droid X. The release was not without controversy though. The Droid X, while greatly raising the bar for Android phones in general, does so at the expense of the very power users and community that made the original Droid the gotta-have phone it became. Alienating this group may have far reaching consequences for Motorola.
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RE[4]: uggg
by nt_jerkface on Thu 22nd Jul 2010 18:00 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: uggg"
nt_jerkface
Member since:
2009-08-26

Allowing custom ROMS makes piracy easier.

Are you going to deny this?

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: uggg
by WorknMan on Thu 22nd Jul 2010 19:17 in reply to "RE[4]: uggg"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

Allowing custom ROMS makes piracy easier.

Are you going to deny this?


Yes. It's quite trivial to install pirated apps on a non-rooted phone with the vendor-supplied OS. Just enable installing from outside sources, download a .apk file from the dark web, feed it to your phone, and you're good to go. I do it myself, but only because I don't like having my credit card charged for the 24-hour trial, and I always buy the apps I like. I do not condone piracy. (Note: My phone was rooted about a week ago, but I haven't installed any custom roms yet.)

BTW: The DroidX has been rooted:
http://www.engadget.com/2010/07/22/droid-x-can-now-be-counted-among...

Edited 2010-07-22 19:23 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

The Arms Race Continues...
by bornagainenguin on Thu 22nd Jul 2010 20:12 in reply to "RE[5]: uggg"
bornagainenguin Member since:
2005-08-07

WorknMan announced...



...and now back to Motorola's side of the field where their team of engineers will attempt to hold up their end of the whack-a-mole game. There's a David and Goliath fight if there ever were one! On this side the handful of over worked and underpaid Motorola engineers, on that side a teaming mass of people all determined to have an unfettered mini-computer that can do phone calls with nothing but time on their side...

Heh. It hardly seems fair does it? Of course just because its been rooted doesn't mean the trouble is over, on the contrary it means the struggle has just begun!

--bornagainpenguin

PS: Link seems to be down for some reason...anyone else having this issue or is it just me?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: uggg
by nt_jerkface on Sat 24th Jul 2010 04:27 in reply to "RE[5]: uggg"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Yes. It's quite trivial to install pirated apps on a non-rooted phone with the vendor-supplied OS.


Custom ROMs allow apps to be stored on the sd disk along with an archive of pirated games. So yes allowing custom ROMs makes piracy easier.


Just enable installing from outside sources, download a .apk file from the dark web, feed it to your phone, and you're good to go.


Yes I am quite aware of how easy it is. Google really screwed up by offering little protection for developers.


BTW: The DroidX has been rooted:


Well the bootloader hasn't been cracked yet so don't get too excited.

But to really lock down a device like a phone the OS and apps need to be tied together. The PS3 uses a well designed model where even if the firmware is someday hacked a newer game or psn access can require a firmware overwrite.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: uggg
by werpu on Fri 23rd Jul 2010 13:50 in reply to "RE[4]: uggg"
werpu Member since:
2006-01-18

Allowing custom ROMS makes piracy easier.

Are you going to deny this?


It is as easy as on any rom, you just have to disable the setting for install roms only from well known resources, after that it is just uploading the apk and starting the install process, it is nothing more or nothing less. Sorry but you dont have a clear picture about android :-)
It does not make any difference if it is a custom rom or anything else, and sorry Motorola currently is the only vendor who seriously locks the bootloaders all others are easily hackable and some totally open.

Reply Parent Score: 2