Linked by David Adams on Tue 27th Jul 2010 07:35 UTC, submitted by sjvn
Linux Some people hate the idea of adding proprietary software to their desktop Linux. For these people, there are Linux distributions such as gNewSense that use only free software. For the rest of us, who use distributions such as Fedora, openSUSE and Ubuntu, there are times we either want to, or feel forced to, add proprietary programs such as Adobe Flash or Skype or the ability to play proprietary audio and video formats such as MP3 or commercial DVDs to your Linux desktop. Here's how to do it.
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Shooting yourself in the foot.
by westlake on Tue 27th Jul 2010 14:48 UTC
westlake
Member since:
2010-01-07

When everything of interest in FOSS is ported to OSX and Windows there is no very compelling reason to migrate to Linux.

When you add barrriers to the port of the successful proprietary app to Linux, you make a bad case for migration even worse.

H.264 is deeply, deeply, entrenched outside the web. In theatrical production, broadcast, cable and sattelite distribution, cellular, home video, industrial and military applications.

The MPEG LA licensors are dominated by manufacturers, and in particular the Asian mega-corporations like Samsung, Sony, Toshiba and Mitsubishi. Google is big, but not that big.

The web is not the world, after all - and new standards can - and will - evolve in environments wholly outside the geek's control, even when the geek is as rich as Google.

That is why Canonical licensed H.264 for its OEM distributions.

Reply Score: 1

theTSF Member since:
2005-09-27

So you are saying that Linux is of such poor quality that the only reason people use it, is access to free Open Source Software...

Perhaps I am missing some sarcasm. As an avid Mac, Windows, and Linux user. There are valid reasons to use each OS over the other ones.

Most Linux distributions usually have a rather robust set of command line tools at your beck and call... Far more then OS X. And windows still thinks DOS is an acceptable command line, and power shell is not supported well enough for normal use. Sure you can get most of these tools for the platforms but that is a lot of work and effort... And some may cause some crazy things happen to your normal installs as well dirty up your filesystems. I love using Linux for appliance and server based solutions. Low overhead easy programming and setup, and lets you do things that OS X and WIndows says no I don't think you should do that... No matter how bad you need it.

Windows (7) is a good Middle ground OS. A decent UI to do medium advanced things easily, much easier then with Linux. Also if you have compatibility issues going in Windows fixes them. It is quite good at running desktop applications. And runs much nicer then X11 for Linux. It is well designed for CAD work and Visual Studios is really a nice IDE.

OS X is good for productivity. Its UI is clean and efficient and predictable. Emails, Browsing the Web, Writing Documents, and graphics editing it is quite useful at those jobs. Also with enough Unix command line tools for good connectivity with Linux servers and Windows as well.

Sure they all have their faults too... But really I actually Like all 3 OS's and they all really have a place for their usage

Reply Parent Score: 3

westlake Member since:
2010-01-07

So you are saying that Linux is of such poor quality that the only reason people use it, is access to free Open Source Software... [i][/i]

What I'm saying is that, for all practical purposes, Linux runs a sub-set of the apps available to the OSX and Windows user.

That is not a good place to be when you hold a bare 1% share of the desktop - and the iOS threatens to become an even bigger presence on the web.

That is not a good place to be when you are all but invisible in OEM system sales. The kit builder - the technical hobbysist - does not drive adoption.

Applications drive adoption. Applications drive development. The technology of the OS is secondary - always.

That is why the Amigas of this world fall by the wayside.

The OSX and Windows user rates zero for ideological purity and political correctness.

He cannot be moved on that basis.

---and the truth is that you need him. 86% of the funding for The Moz Foundation comes from AdSense. From the mass consumer market.

Reply Parent Score: 1

vivainio Member since:
2008-12-26


OS X is good for productivity. Its UI is clean and efficient and predictable. Emails, Browsing the Web, Writing Documents, and graphics editing it is quite useful at those jobs.


Read: it does a few things that are trivial on Windows anyway.

The real selling point of OSX is that it doesn't (yet) have all the malware scanners Windows & corporate IT forces on you, so it will end up working faster than Windows.

Reply Parent Score: 2

UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

Windows (7) is a good Middle ground OS. A decent UI to do medium advanced things easily, much easier then with Linux. Also if you have compatibility issues going in Windows fixes them. It is quite good at running desktop applications. And runs much nicer then X11 for Linux. It is well designed for CAD work and Visual Studios is really a nice IDE.

I honestly thought the same... until last night, when my sister's friend asked me to "fix" her relatively new laptop which has Windows 7. To put it simply, it is the most f***ed Windows install I've seen in years. With all Microsoft has done since XP SP2 and Vista, it's clear it's not working. The machine has no restore discs, and the "recovery" partition doesn't allow a full factory restore, so it's gonna have to wait. Not that I would "trust" the "recovery" partition of an infected (infested?) machine anyway.

Yeah, Windows is easy... until its insecurity and its typical clueless user meet for a little walk on the Internet. Then, it becomes completely untrustworthy, slow, and an outright a pain in the ass to use, with popups everywhere and a useless half-year expired commercial anti-virus program that refuses to do anything besides send more money to actually be able to, eh, *use* it. Yeah, like anyone's gonna *trust* such a machine to not send that credit card info out while the system is infested and the AV refuses to do ANYTHING about it! [OK, yeah, I'm sure a lot of clueless people will do that... if they can figure out that their subscription has run out in the first place, that is.)

Ah, it's a good thing I left that OS a couple years ago. It's clear it still has a long, long way to go. Just had to vent; my old feelings toward the OS have resurfaced for a moment. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26


H.264 is deeply, deeply, entrenched outside the web. In theatrical production, broadcast, cable and sattelite distribution, cellular, home video, industrial and military applications.

The MPEG LA licensors are dominated by manufacturers, and in particular the Asian mega-corporations like Samsung, Sony, Toshiba and Mitsubishi. Google is big, but not that big.


You obviously haven't read the OSNews guidelines on acceptable H.264 opinions.

Here is an example of an acceptable opinion:
H.264 is the product of an alliance of evil and I hope Google destroys this alliance with (latest favored open source codec).

Any opinion that deviates too far from this position will be modded down.

Now OSNews readers please vote parent down to teach him a lesson.

Reply Parent Score: 1

westlake Member since:
2010-01-07

H.264 is the product of an alliance of evil and I hope Google destroys this alliance with (latest favored open source codec).

That is - a little - unfair. The problem is that the geek is web-centric. The problem is that the geek expects the world to turn on a dime.

For example, production and marketing decisions for this year's back-to-school and Christmas shopping seasons have been made - and we are already into the next cycle.

The "Flip" pocket camcorder that supports WebM is at least two or three years down the road. It may never happen.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Zifre Member since:
2009-10-04

nt_jerkface, please stop being a troll, and please make your name less self-descriptive.

You really never add anything to the discussions, you just troll. It's okay to have a different opinion about something, but please be nice about it. Most OSNews commenters seem to do that fine - the people on this site are much smarter and more respectful than any other site I know of. So please don't be a jerk.

And, I don't quite see how the part of the parent comment that you quoted is opinion. He simply stating the fact that it will be very hard for anything to overcome H.264 because it is so ubiquitous. And that's true. (And this is coming from one of the usual open source advocates.)

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

I'm sure Metasploit runs great on Windows but I'll stick with the fully native Linux based install. Apache runs on Windows; great but still not like Apache on native *nix.

Microsoft and Apple's history for addressing bugs and vulnerabilities is another strong case for migrating to other platforms even though the major OSS applications are all intentionally written to run across multiple platforms.

Reply Parent Score: 3