Linked by David Adams on Sat 31st Jul 2010 06:05 UTC, submitted by fran
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Microsoft had its annual financial analyst meeting on Thursday, and Steve Ballmer answered questions about what the company's answer to the iPad was going to be, and whether Windows Phone 7 was going to be a part of that product strategy. He said, "We're coming . . . We're coming full guns. The operating system is called Windows." Ballmer and Microsoft so don't get it. I can't believe Steve Ballmer is making me feel sorry for Microsoft.
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BallmerKnowsBest
Member since:
2008-06-02

It's easy to say anything wasn't the first at anything, and it's a great (but intellectually lazy) way to dismiss a company or technology.


Yes, it's almost as facile as praising a company for being "first" regardless of whether that's true or has any significance.

The iPad is the first blockbuster tablet. The iPad revitalized a desperately stagnant tablet market, the way that the iPhone revitalized a desperately stagnant smartphone market.


And...? That will be worth a grand total of Jack-all if Apple repeats the same mistakes they made with the Mac. Which they're on course to do, given that the response to competition from Android et al has been to make their platform even MORE closed and even LESS attractive to developers.

That whole "no cross-platform apps on iOS" restriction is particularly stupid and short-sighted. Doesn't anyone at Apple remember what happened to AOL? Exclusive content is worth nothing when people can get the same thing (or better) elsewhere, especially when "elsewhere" has much better pricing.

Haters can pick and chose the things that Apple didn't do first, but it just shows how desperate they are to dismiss the huge success Apple has had.


Just as trying to give Apple credit for being "first" at everything betrays a desperate need brag about something, even if it's only by proxy. Psychological transference at its most pathetic.

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