Linked by David Adams on Sat 31st Jul 2010 06:05 UTC, submitted by fran
PDAs, Cellphones, Wireless Microsoft had its annual financial analyst meeting on Thursday, and Steve Ballmer answered questions about what the company's answer to the iPad was going to be, and whether Windows Phone 7 was going to be a part of that product strategy. He said, "We're coming . . . We're coming full guns. The operating system is called Windows." Ballmer and Microsoft so don't get it. I can't believe Steve Ballmer is making me feel sorry for Microsoft.
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RE[3]: Honk! Honk!
by Laurence on Mon 2nd Aug 2010 09:39 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Honk! Honk!"
Laurence
Member since:
2007-03-26

Windows 7 gave us the birth of minwin. However the GP has a point. Windows does not scale from embedded to server with the same kernel. Windows phone 7 is a different OS than windows 7.

People are confusing the terms 'OS' and 'kernel' here.

Kernel is the smallest and lowest level part of the OS. It's usually just a few MB in size.
Where as the OS is the kernel and userspace tools as well.

Windows as an OS does not scale well. It's user space tools are not touch sentric and have a huge memory foot print - so it's out of the question for phones.

However theres little reason why NT as a kernel couldn't run on embedded devices, beyond the fact that Microsoft already have embedded user space tools built for a different kernel.

Another example of my point is how Windows 7 Home and Windows Server 2008 both have an NT kernel despite having a different set of user space tools tayloring the operating systems for entirely different markets (desktop and server).

And going back to the Win7 vs Linux / OS X, the same point is true. Neither Android / WebOS nor iOS use Linux nor OS X's desktop or server user space tools. They're the same kernel but effectively a whole new OS in their own right.



So really, no desktop OS scales well. But the kernels can and often do. And this is true for Linux, BSD / Mach and NT too.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Honk! Honk!
by Laurence on Mon 2nd Aug 2010 13:32 in reply to "RE[3]: Honk! Honk!"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

Is there any chance the "hit-and-run" negative moderator can explain what's inaccurate about my comments?

I'd love to know so that I don't keep spouting the same misinformation.

However without a rebuttal, I'm left to assume that the moderation was based on an emotional knee-jerk reaction from an offended fanboy rather than the accuracy of the content itself

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Honk! Honk!
by sorpigal on Mon 2nd Aug 2010 17:38 in reply to "RE[3]: Honk! Honk!"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

To be perfectly fair the Linux kernel found on desktop Linux is at least as different from the Linux kernel found on most mobile devices as the NT kernel found on dekstop windows is different from the NT kernel found on mobile devices.

Where Windows falls down is the cross-stack integration: Pieces are too tightly coupled together and until minwin impossible to pare down. These days it's easier (so I hear) but still nothing like as easy as it is to build a similar-footprint Linux system.

It's really not about the kernel.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Honk! Honk!
by Laurence on Mon 2nd Aug 2010 23:02 in reply to "RE[4]: Honk! Honk!"
Laurence Member since:
2007-03-26

To be perfectly fair the Linux kernel found on desktop Linux is at least as different from the Linux kernel found on most mobile devices as the NT kernel found on dekstop windows is different from the NT kernel found on mobile devices.

Where Windows falls down is the cross-stack integration: Pieces are too tightly coupled together and until minwin impossible to pare down. These days it's easier (so I hear) but still nothing like as easy as it is to build a similar-footprint Linux system.

It's really not about the kernel.

Well that was my point. People keep talking about kernels in this thread but the real problem with Windows isn't NT.

Reply Parent Score: 2