Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 10th Aug 2010 22:00 UTC, submitted by JRepin
KDE KDE today celebrates its semi-annual release event, releasing new versions of the Plasma Desktop and Netbook workspaces, the KDE Development Platform and a large number of applications available in their 4.5.0 versions. In this release, the KDE team focused on stability and completeness of the desktop experience.
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RE: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by Kalessin on Wed 11th Aug 2010 00:03 UTC in reply to "Comment by mtzmtulivu"
Kalessin
Member since:
2007-01-18

Unfortunately, while the way that they released KDE 4 ultimately resulted in a very solid DE, it also seems to have created a serious stigma for the project. I would love it if folks would just look at KDE 4 for what it is, but as with many things, it takes tons of good publicity to overcome even a small amount of bad publicity, and KDE 4.0 created more than just a small amount of bad publicity, regardless of whether it was actually good for the project from a technology standpoint to release it that they way that they did.

In any case, I think that KDE 4 has been quite solid and that it has been for a while (I've used it since 4.0), and I can't wait for my distro (Arch) to get 4.5 in the stable repository so that I can install.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by WereCatf on Wed 11th Aug 2010 01:57 in reply to "RE: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Unfortunately, while the way that they released KDE 4 ultimately resulted in a very solid DE, it also seems to have created a serious stigma for the project. I would love it if folks would just look at KDE 4 for what it is, but as with many things, it takes tons of good publicity to overcome even a small amount of bad publicity, and KDE 4.0 created more than just a small amount of bad publicity, regardless of whether it was actually good for the project from a technology standpoint to release it that they way that they did.

As any good PR-person would know, first impressions are everything. KDE4.0 was the one to give the first impressions of KDE4 to many people and that'll be almost impossible to get over until KDE5.

From technology standpoint it was perhaps a more efficient way of doing things than releasing "KDE4.0 Developer Release" first was it really that much more efficient? Wouldn't such a Developer Release have sufficed? It would atleast have reduced the number of complaints and not created such an overwhelming bad impression. I mean, I do understand why they did it the way they did, I just don't really believe it was worth it.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by lemur2 on Wed 11th Aug 2010 02:12 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Unfortunately, while the way that they released KDE 4 ultimately resulted in a very solid DE, it also seems to have created a serious stigma for the project. I would love it if folks would just look at KDE 4 for what it is, but as with many things, it takes tons of good publicity to overcome even a small amount of bad publicity, and KDE 4.0 created more than just a small amount of bad publicity, regardless of whether it was actually good for the project from a technology standpoint to release it that they way that they did.

As any good PR-person would know, first impressions are everything. KDE4.0 was the one to give the first impressions of KDE4 to many people and that'll be almost impossible to get over until KDE5.

From technology standpoint it was perhaps a more efficient way of doing things than releasing "KDE4.0 Developer Release" first was it really that much more efficient? Wouldn't such a Developer Release have sufficed? It would atleast have reduced the number of complaints and not created such an overwhelming bad impression. I mean, I do understand why they did it the way they did, I just don't really believe it was worth it.


I have a distinct impression that the "overwhelming bad impression" you speak of was actually just a beat up. It is driven by corporate PR agendas, and not by actual people.

Think about it for a moment ... KDE 4.0 was released a couple of years ago, for no cost, and the developers said it was a development version, and they solicited user feedback with it. Getting user feedback necessarily means getting users to try it. The earlier you get user feedback incorporated into the design, the better the eventual result is.

Well, user feedback they got, and now KDE SC 4.5 is arguably the best desktop available today, bar none.

Meanwhile, what about a near-contemporary desktop system released some years ago, which cost users real money:

http://ourlan.homelinux.net/qdig/?Qwd=./KDE4_desktop&Qif=91992_vist...

Today, where is the same level of media-driven disarrangement of that?

Today, any mention of KDE 4.0 is a smear campaign, pure and simple, driven by a PR agenda. Pay no attention to it, it is ancient history. Just enjoy the best-of-breed KDE SC 4.5, and laugh at those who want to keep you away from trying it.

Edited 2010-08-11 02:32 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by No it isnt on Wed 11th Aug 2010 10:53 in reply to "RE[2]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

As I repeatedly point out in every discussion of the infamous KDE 4.0: OS X 10.0 was a bug-ridden, bloated failure and barely beta quality as well. Somehow, Apple was immediately forgiven, even though the first half-decent upgrade of OS X (10.2) cost money.

Reply Parent Score: 5