Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 10th Aug 2010 22:00 UTC, submitted by JRepin
KDE KDE today celebrates its semi-annual release event, releasing new versions of the Plasma Desktop and Netbook workspaces, the KDE Development Platform and a large number of applications available in their 4.5.0 versions. In this release, the KDE team focused on stability and completeness of the desktop experience.
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RE[8]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 11th Aug 2010 15:05 UTC in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
Thom_Holwerda
Member since:
2005-06-29

This is utter nonsense Thom. There is a world of difference in offering a supposedly "finished" commercial product for sale to consumers and an open source project (not even a distribution, but a project mind you) offering a .0 version for soliciting user feedback.


.0 is a finished product. That's what it denotes. The fact that GNOME made the same mistake with 2.0 is none of my concern, nor is it any of KDE's. Maybe I'm old-fashioned, but I'm from before version numbers became a sleazy marketing tool to trick users into trying out and/or buying unstable, untested, and broken software.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[9]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by mtzmtulivu on Wed 11th Aug 2010 16:13 in reply to "RE[8]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
mtzmtulivu Member since:
2006-11-14

you are entitled to your opinion thom and we already know it ..you are now appearing to be trolling more than anything else.

4.0 was released more than two years ago and i am sure you have already expressed your views more than enough and you are heared. Wait until 5.0 is released and see if your opinions were heared and you can start making comments again when that release also fail to adhere to your "old fashioned" ideas.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by m_abs on Wed 11th Aug 2010 18:24 in reply to "RE[8]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
m_abs Member since:
2005-07-06

.0 is a finished product.

No, .0 usually mean "new, incomplete and a high probability of errors".

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[10]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by Hiev on Wed 11th Aug 2010 18:42 in reply to "RE[9]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
Hiev Member since:
2005-09-27

I thougth it ment "first version ready for public release".

But times change.

Edited 2010-08-11 18:42 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Comment by mtzmtulivu
by sorpigal on Thu 12th Aug 2010 16:25 in reply to "RE[8]: Comment by mtzmtulivu"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

.0 is a finished product. That's what it denotes.

And that's where you're wrong.

The significance of 4.0 is "the next version after 3.9" aka, none at all. The major version number bump corresponds to a major infrastructure change, the .0 just means "first release" and is not intended to imply, does not imply and should not be mistaken for meaning "finished product."

Only in a sick world does the .0 version promise completeness or stability, much less "finished"ness, a quality that is essentially unmeasurable (unless your name is Knuth). Rationally , when I radically change the underlying infrastructure and break everything I bump a major version number. Therefore, releases after KDE changed the infrastructure in 3.x are 4.x. There are two options: Don't assign any official version numbers to a release, release with some kind of version number, or don't release.

If you don't assign any official version number then all you get is confusion. Some kind of identifier is required for coordination

If you release with any kind of version number you are obliged to call the first release "4.0" -- or you do some backwards shennanigans like "3.99-4.0prerelease" which is just stupid nonsense done to avoid the "sacred .0" release.

If you don't release at all you get nowhere! You are *supposed* to release early and often, especially before it's ready for prime time.

The only problem here is illogical, irrational users (this means you) who think for some reason that a ".0 release" is somehow special. It. Is. Not. The only special thing about it is that some portion of it is likely to be poorly tested.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

The only problem here is illogical, irrational users (this means you) who think for some reason that a ".0 release" is somehow special. It. Is. Not. The only special thing about it is that some portion of it is likely to be poorly tested.


Software that is poorly tested is called alpha or beta - not .0.

Reply Parent Score: 1