Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 11th Aug 2010 19:14 UTC, submitted by Cytor
Sun Solaris, OpenSolaris Due to me not working for OSNews these past eight weeks, I've been a bit out of the loop, as I didn't really follow technology news. I did notice that a lot is going on in OpenSolaris land, and today, Oracle has outlined what it has planned for Solaris 11 - and according to some, the fears about OpenSolaris' future were justified.
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RE: Is it bad? Not really.
by unoengborg on Thu 12th Aug 2010 01:54 UTC in reply to "Is it bad? Not really."
unoengborg
Member since:
2005-07-06

I would say the advantage not covered is the combination of Linux and Solaris, is that OpenSolaris had a free stable production quality ZFS implementation.

Linux really doen't have anything that matches OpenSolaris ZFS in ease of use and features.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Linux really doen't have anything that matches OpenSolaris ZFS in ease of use and features.


Nothing that is production ready. Wait a year and BTRFS will be here. If you are looking to the future with your data storage needs, BTRFS is a really good reason to *not* go to ZFS, unless you are already running Solaris everywhere.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Is it bad? Not really.
by tyrione on Thu 12th Aug 2010 04:25 in reply to "RE[2]: Is it bad? Not really."
tyrione Member since:
2005-11-21

"Linux really doen't have anything that matches OpenSolaris ZFS in ease of use and features.


Nothing that is production ready. Wait a year and BTRFS will be here. If you are looking to the future with your data storage needs, BTRFS is a really good reason to *not* go to ZFS, unless you are already running Solaris everywhere.
"

Who makes BTRFS? Oracle.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[3]: Is it bad? Not really.
by phoenix on Thu 12th Aug 2010 05:45 in reply to "RE[2]: Is it bad? Not really."
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

"Linux really doen't have anything that matches OpenSolaris ZFS in ease of use and features.


Nothing that is production ready. Wait a year and BTRFS will be here. If you are looking to the future with your data storage needs, BTRFS is a really good reason to *not* go to ZFS, unless you are already running Solaris everywhere.
"

Btrfs is at least 5 years off from being a replacement for ZFS as it stands today. Btrfs is not anywhere near the same league as ZFS right now. It's absolutely hilarious when people try to suggest "some future version of" Btrfs as a viable alternative for ZFS of today.

Reply Parent Score: 5

spanglywires Member since:
2006-10-23

"Linux really doen't have anything that matches OpenSolaris ZFS in ease of use and features.


Nothing that is production ready. Wait a year and BTRFS will be here. If you are looking to the future with your data storage needs, BTRFS is a really good reason to *not* go to ZFS, unless you are already running Solaris everywhere.
"

You do know btrfs is *only* a filesystem right?

ZFS is a rampant layering violation ;)

ZFS is more than just an fs, its a volume manager too. How are you going to RAID your btrfs? Through mdadm? Theres a good reason not to use Linux in the enterprise straight away.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[3]: Is it bad? Not really.
by Luminair on Thu 12th Aug 2010 17:20 in reply to "RE[2]: Is it bad? Not really."
Luminair Member since:
2007-03-30

btrfs is limited by the laws of physics. it cant catch up to zfs in a year.

assume the purchase of sun by oracle has delayed zfs development by a year. btrfs still has multiple years of development to go before it matches zfs features and stability.

Reply Parent Score: 2