Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 13th Aug 2010 22:58 UTC, submitted by Alex Forster
Legal We're far from done with the Oracle v. Google lawsuit. The search giant has responded to the lawsuit, and Miguel De Icaza has provided a very interesting insight into the case. His report has been confirmed by James Gosling, known as the father of Java who left Sun right after the merger. Icaza speculates that the potential to monetise on Java by suing Google was pitched by Jonathan Schwartz during Sun's sales talks with Oracle. Oh boy.
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What comes next?
by churlish_Helmut on Sat 14th Aug 2010 01:11 UTC
churlish_Helmut
Member since:
2010-04-12

What comes next?

A proprietary Java?
Will I be sued for developing apps with Java without paying a license fee?

Are there any technologies which oracle may destroy?

Does this have any consequence for googles agenda?

And for the End: Is there any important company left, that I can trust or like?

Edited 2010-08-14 01:19 UTC

Reply Score: 3

RE: What comes next?
by pgeorgi on Sat 14th Aug 2010 07:54 in reply to "What comes next?"
pgeorgi Member since:
2010-02-18

Is there any important company left, that I can trust or like?

Companies aren't there to like or trust. They exist to make money to their owners (or shareholders in case of these pesty megacorps).

While privately held businesses might be somewhat more balanced (and care about customers or employees, or "fans" for that matter), traded companies have a legal obligation to screw those to the maximum extent possible as long as that improves the quarterly results of the share holders.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: What comes next?
by nt_jerkface on Sat 14th Aug 2010 19:33 in reply to "RE: What comes next?"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26


While privately held businesses might be somewhat more balanced (and care about customers or employees, or "fans" for that matter), traded companies have a legal obligation to screw those to the maximum extent possible as long as that improves the quarterly results of the share holders.


++Good point

Open source fans need to quit getting in bed with publicly traded companies. At the end of the day their shareholders are more important than you.

Privately held companies like Valve are usually more focused on their product. They of course want to make a profit as well but aren't under pressure to please a large group of anonymous owners that only care about a return on their investment.

I sometimes wish Stallman started an anti-megacorp movement instead of anti-proprietary. There are a lot of small privately held software companies that treat their customers far better than some of the megacorps that support open source. I had the owner of a small private software company email me at 2 AM his time over a minor problem I had with the software. That's awesome.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: What comes next?
by Soulbender on Sun 15th Aug 2010 01:50 in reply to "What comes next?"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

Is there any important company left, that I can trust or like?


Depends on your definition of important. Do you mean publicly traded multinational corporations? Then no, and you should never have trusted any of them in the first place.
Do you mean smaller mainly privately owned companies? Then yes, this is the segment where you will find companies you can trust.

As someone said at my first ever job: it's better to be a big customer to a small company than a small customer to a big company.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE: What comes next?
by gnufreex on Sun 15th Aug 2010 09:09 in reply to "What comes next?"
gnufreex Member since:
2010-05-06

You should never trust any company, you should always look for leverage.

For using Java, you have leverage. OpenJDK is GPL and distributed by Oracle, meaning that Oracle can't sue anybody over it.

Oracle won't sue developers of Java, they never did that.

Dalvik is not Java. It is competitor to Java, like Mono is. Don't use Mono or Dalvik (or .NET for that matter), and you are in the clear. Use OpenJDK and Oracle can't do anything against you.

Consequences to Google are result of their lack of thought they put into Android design. If they based their VM on standard OpenJDK, this wouldn't happen. They tired to EEE Java, and now they are in problems.

Reply Parent Score: 0