Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 16th Aug 2010 18:49 UTC
Internet & Networking Not too long ago Adobe started a "We love Apple" campaign, as a response to Apple's continuous negative remarks about the company. With Flash 10.1 slowly but surely appearing on more and more mobile devices, it seems like the company just doesn't care about it any more. Adobe's CEO Shantanu Narayen has said they've "moved on".
Thread beginning with comment 437081
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
Funny how they spin it...
by umccullough on Mon 16th Aug 2010 18:59 UTC
umccullough
Member since:
2006-01-26

It's amusing how Adobe plays the "open" vs "closed" game speaking as a consumer, but not as a provider.

In other words, they talk about how open or closed the OS platforms they support are, while only offering a semi-closed platform for Flash developers and consumers.

If Adobe ever provides an open-source reference platform for Flash - then maybe I'll seriously consider them an "open" platform. At that point, we may even finally see a good flash player available for Haiku.

Reply Score: 11

RE: Funny how they spin it...
by nt_jerkface on Mon 16th Aug 2010 20:05 in reply to "Funny how they spin it..."
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Open sourcing Flash would take away content protection which is one of its primary advantages over HTML5.

From a business perspective open sourcing Flash would be a poor move.

I don't care for Flash either but HTML5 was designed without considering the needs of content producers which is why even Google has said that Flash isn't going anywhere.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Funny how they spin it...
by mckill on Mon 16th Aug 2010 20:16 in reply to "RE: Funny how they spin it..."
mckill Member since:
2007-06-12

which is why even Google has said that Flash isn't going anywhere.


Are you sure Google didn't just say they were in love with Flash and how it was going to be integrated into Chrome + Android simply to spite Apple and try and increase their market share? Up until that point Google seemed to be ready to dump flash and move to HTML5 video, and for what Youtube does, google does not need protected content.

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Why would releasing the Flash source code mean removing DRM? They can go GPL, write there own license or adopt any other OSS license that has no issue with including DRM be it a clised binary addition or open source itself. Heck, if they release the DRM source also then they stand to gain from people improving it; DRM sucks but it's still a security mechanism that can only benefit from transparency.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Funny how they spin it...
by kaiwai on Tue 17th Aug 2010 06:56 in reply to "RE: Funny how they spin it..."
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

Open sourcing Flash would take away content protection which is one of its primary advantages over HTML5.

From a business perspective open sourcing Flash would be a poor move.

I don't care for Flash either but HTML5 was designed without considering the needs of content producers which is why even Google has said that Flash isn't going anywhere.


Then open source it all except for the DRM binary blob which can be provided and linked against as a separate library rather than being in the plugin itself - you know, that strange practice of modularisation? There are solutions - Adobe just doesn't want to do it because they would be shown up in 5 minutes by some keen coders creating a superior open source implementation.

Reply Parent Score: 5

anda_skoa Member since:
2005-07-07

Open sourcing Flash would take away content protection which is one of its primary advantages over HTML5.


Coming from someone as insightful as you usually are, this feels almost like trolling.

Any kind of digital content protection is based on math that makes is impossible (or really hard) to untransform the protected data without the key or partner key which transformed it.

For example a GPG or SMIME encrypted email is always equally secured independent on whether it passes through a close or open source mail server. If it weren't there would be no point in using encryption for email at all because it is highly likely that it will pass through an open source one on its way to the receiver.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE: Funny how they spin it...
by fithisux on Tue 17th Aug 2010 09:17 in reply to "Funny how they spin it..."
fithisux Member since:
2006-01-22

I believe that lack of standardized hardware is the biggest problem. Adobe does not help in this direction and accusing Apple is the worst thing to do. But I also believe that Apple is doing the same.

Reply Parent Score: 2