Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 19th Aug 2010 22:28 UTC
Multimedia, AV You know, I really like America and its citizens. Beautiful country, lovely people, nothing but good experiences on my end. However, like everyone else, the US has its problems, and one particular annoying one is the power of lobby and interests groups. I couldn't believe my eyes when I read that the RIAA and NAB (National Association of Broadcasters) are asking Congress to mandate FM chips in all portable devices - cell phones, mp3 players, PDAs, everything. Wait, what?
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jabbotts
Member since:
2007-09-06

In a five minute carpool ride from work to home, I've easily hear the latest "hot" song more than three times. How to kill an interesting song dead; add it to radio. Why play lots of great music when you can overplay a few songs into repetitive oblivion. It's like english cooking; boil it 'till the flavor's gone and the structure is mush.

So, now that the radio broadcasters are driving away customers and/or not keeping up with technology, they want to mandate radio FM radio receivers in all devices. I don't recall the AM folks trying to mandate receivers for that band when FM eclipsed them. I haven't seen any historical record of the ice delivery industry trying to mandate ice consumption when refrigeration eclipsed the basic icebox.

In the US it's worse with the FCC granting duopoly over digital radio which effecively destroyed any possability of natural market competition. Even better that they said "ok, you two companies can have digital radio but you are barred from ever merging". There, that will insure competition right? A few short years ago 'uh, we both spent all the money you gave us to start this industry and we're both going to be bankrupt unless you let us merge' - "oh, well, alright then".. and now the US has a monopoly owned digital radio industry. Bravo!!

(I'm unsure if we're any different north of the border or if we're just as hosed by having only he US digial radio providers in our regions.)

Reply Parent Score: 3

Chicken Blood Member since:
2005-12-21

It's like english cooking; boil it 'till the flavor's gone and the structure is mush.


What? The 1950s called, they want their dumbassed stereotypes back!

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Sorry, does the analogy based on stereotyped boiled everything cooking, though out of date, not match up to the the affect of public radio boiling the life out of any initially interesting music by overplaying it?

Reply Parent Score: 2

ssa2204 Member since:
2006-04-22

" It's like english cooking; boil it 'till the flavor's gone and the structure is mush.


What? The 1950s called, they want their dumbassed stereotypes back!
"

Ummm...as a born Englishman, who lives in America (land of cuisine from the world over) I have to agree with that assessment of English cuisine. It made me laugh as it pretty much describes my parents and grandparents cooking (which I freaking hated). Yeah, as much as I would like to say this is 1950s stereotype, unfortunately visits to relatives says otherwise.

Reply Parent Score: 2

WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

In the US it's worse with the FCC granting duopoly over digital radio which effecively destroyed any possability of natural market competition. Even better that they said "ok, you two companies can have digital radio but you are barred from ever merging". There, that will insure competition right? A few short years ago 'uh, we both spent all the money you gave us to start this industry and we're both going to be bankrupt unless you let us merge' - "oh, well, alright then".. and now the US has a monopoly owned digital radio industry. Bravo!!


Eh, that's alright... with services like Slacker, Pandora, etc, satellite radio's days are numbered anyway. Just wait until they get this technology built into car stereos, so you don't have to stream them from your phone anymore.

Reply Parent Score: 2

jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

Consider that the analog spectrum was auctioned out to many different carriers including segments set aside for non-profit and personal use. The digital spectrum was sold wholesale to two companies that later merged into one; no non-profit or private segments set aside. You might not be streaming slacker over expensive cell networks if competitive digital radio broadcasters where allowed spectrum. Thing's happened differently in europe so that may also be an indication of how digital radio could have evolved here with healthy competition allowed.

Reply Parent Score: 2