Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 20th Aug 2010 21:40 UTC, submitted by koki
BeOS & Derivatives This summer, too, the Haikuproject is part of the Google Summer of Code event. One of the more interesting projects is the Services Kit (draft document!) by Christophe "Shusui" Huriaux, which is an API to facilitate the creation of native web-enabled programs using standard web protocols and data exchange mechanisms.
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RE: Strain
by jonas.kirilla on Sat 21st Aug 2010 13:32 UTC in reply to "Strain"
jonas.kirilla
Member since:
2005-07-11

It actually caused severe pain in my "mouse arm" because of all the insane menu navigation.


Some people put emphasis on that special feature - even the Haiku Users Guide:
http://www.haiku-os.org/docs/userguide/en/tracker.html#navigating

I myself don't use it much. Haiku has a rich set of keyboard shortcuts and also an optional filemanager mode which is more browser-like, which some people prefer. Haiku has all the UI features that BeOS borrowed from MacOS (classic) and Windows. Things like Alt-Tab, spring-loaded folders and cut/copy/paste in the file manager.


It generally feels old, awkward and I got a lot of freezes when putting it under pressure (disabling SMP helped somewhat.)


Haiku can't do so much more with the graphics feel until it gains support for accelerated 3D graphics (perhaps through Gallium) which would allow more complex composition, partial translucency, live window thumbnails, etc.

About the freezes.. I don't see any system hangs on my quad core, a few crashes a month maybe (with everyday use), but I'm using non-release builds. The system is at the mercy of its device drivers, and ultimately, one's hardware, so it's not necessarily "Haiku itself" that is to blame, but that is perhaps a bit of an excuse. ;)

I know the Haiku devs work hard on code quality. It's just difficult to build a bug-free system that supports most hardware out there. It's actually quite amazing what Haiku has acheived with so few people.


So I have to ask... is there a point to this project beyond the fun of doing it / nostalgia?


I would have liked for Haiku to be a bit more revolutionary, but the project had to focus and a straight clone of BeOS (+select improvements) was what the community could find consensus around. Haiku will continue to evolve as long as people keep working on it.

Whether or not it's worth our time.. Whether or not it's worth -your- time.. it all depends on what you want and expect.

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