Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 20th Aug 2010 21:40 UTC, submitted by koki
BeOS & Derivatives This summer, too, the Haikuproject is part of the Google Summer of Code event. One of the more interesting projects is the Services Kit (draft document!) by Christophe "Shusui" Huriaux, which is an API to facilitate the creation of native web-enabled programs using standard web protocols and data exchange mechanisms.
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RE[3]: Strain
by WereCatf on Sun 22nd Aug 2010 05:52 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: Strain"
WereCatf
Member since:
2006-02-15

I don't think that nostalgia is the sole (or even primary) driving force behind retaining the BeOS visual appearance in Haiku. Minimalism was always one of the main design (and philosophical) goals behind the OS - a minimalist, understated interface is consistent with that.

Could be, or could be not. I don't frequent Haiku-related boards or follow their discussions elsewhere, I've just stumbled across a few blogs and a few discussion threads every now and then and in those I've seen lots of people with those rose-colored shades screaming murder at every idea regarding enhancing the looks of the UI. So yeah, I admit that I might have just been looking in the wrong place and gotten the wrong impression but that's how it is.

Of course, aesthetic preferences are just about the most subjective & widely-varying opinions that people can have. Even leaving aside nostalgia, I find that the mix of subtle/understated UI & clean but slightly-cartoony graphics is easier on my eyes than just about any other UI I've used.

Of course, there is nothing wrong with liking such style. People have different tastes and all that. I was just saying that I doubt the common populace will find Haiku's looks pleasing and will call it ugly or out-of-date.

I, too, find Haiku hideously ugly, but as I said, I really like the underlying technology. I do wish the devs luck with the project and I hope to see Haiku going strong for years to come.

but they also had the restraint to avoid going completely overboard with gratuitous visual effects (as opposed to effects that serve a useful purposes, E.g. to enhance usability by giving better visual feedback).

There's plenty of ways to enhance visual feedback without going overboard, and I agree to an extent: all those glass-effects in Win7 are rather annoying. Such gimmicks are mostly useless from usability standpoint.

But well, let's see...I use Compiz under Linux and I have configured this one plugin so that the windows lose opacity and color saturation the longer they are idle. Ie. a window that I haven't used for a while only has 20% color saturation and 80% opacity. On the other hand, the window I am using has 100% opacity and 100% saturation, and any windows I have just interacted with has the same. Hardly a gimmicky eye-candy effect, but gives plenty of useful visual feedback. Though of course, not everyone would like it.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[4]: Strain
by smashIt on Sun 22nd Aug 2010 09:11 in reply to "RE[3]: Strain"
smashIt Member since:
2005-07-06

Hardly a gimmicky eye-candy effect, but gives plenty of useful visual feedback. Though of course, not everyone would like it.


you never had a document open on the second screen while working with something on the first one, do you?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Strain
by WereCatf on Sun 22nd Aug 2010 10:16 in reply to "RE[4]: Strain"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

you never had a document open on the second screen while working with something on the first one, do you?

Umm. What does that have to do with the example I gave?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: Strain
by Valhalla on Sun 22nd Aug 2010 13:42 in reply to "RE[3]: Strain"
Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24


I, too, find Haiku hideously ugly, but as I said, I really like the underlying technology. I do wish the devs luck with the project and I hope to see Haiku going strong for years to come.

Well, I can't say I find it hideously ugly, but I can't say I find it particularly visually pleasing either. That said, I doubt that this has been any kind of priority with the development team apart from Stippi adding some gradients and a nice set of svg icons. I'd wager that once Haiku get's 3d acceleration (through Gallium most likely) we will see more entusiasm/effort going in to modernizing the look of the gui. Also there are the aforementioned decorators which allows third parties to customize the GUI and thus allowing for 'themes' to be made. As for the menu system, sure it may take nesting to the extreme, but seriously who launches their apps from the menu other than in extreme cases these days? I use shortcuts/launch icons for practically all the non cli apps I use and I doubt I am the exception. Currently the focus is on providing a stable, capable and performing system, once that is in place then making a better looking gui will be a piece of cake in my opinion ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Strain
by WereCatf on Sun 22nd Aug 2010 14:59 in reply to "RE[4]: Strain"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

As for the menu system, sure it may take nesting to the extreme, but seriously who launches their apps from the menu other than in extreme cases these days? I use shortcuts/launch icons for practically all the non cli apps I use and I doubt I am the exception.

Truth be told, having the ability of using icons on the desktop is a really poor excuse for having a messed-up menu. First of all, if you happen to use lots of different applications and occasional gaming you'll end up with horribly cluttered desktop. Secondly, it still makes those cases where you have to dig in to menu any better.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Strain
by bogomipz on Tue 24th Aug 2010 17:27 in reply to "RE[4]: Strain"
bogomipz Member since:
2005-07-11

apart from Stippi adding some gradients and a nice set of svg icons.


Those are not SVG icons! Stippi didn't just design some of the icons, but also invented a brand new file format. And this was actually a quite important improvement! The HVIF, or Haiku Vector Icon Format, is so compact that the icon usually fits in the file's inode in the file system. This means that the icon data is right there when a directory is to be listed, without first reading the content of separately stored icon files, bringing very welcome speed improvements. Rendering HVIF is also much, much faster than rendering a general purpose vector format, especially SVG which is XML based.

Some details on the format;

http://www.haiku-os.org/articles/2009-09-14_why_haiku_vector_icons_...

Reply Parent Score: 2