Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 20th Aug 2010 21:40 UTC, submitted by koki
BeOS & Derivatives This summer, too, the Haikuproject is part of the Google Summer of Code event. One of the more interesting projects is the Services Kit (draft document!) by Christophe "Shusui" Huriaux, which is an API to facilitate the creation of native web-enabled programs using standard web protocols and data exchange mechanisms.
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RE[4]: Strain
by Valhalla on Sun 22nd Aug 2010 13:42 UTC in reply to "RE[3]: Strain"
Valhalla
Member since:
2006-01-24


I, too, find Haiku hideously ugly, but as I said, I really like the underlying technology. I do wish the devs luck with the project and I hope to see Haiku going strong for years to come.

Well, I can't say I find it hideously ugly, but I can't say I find it particularly visually pleasing either. That said, I doubt that this has been any kind of priority with the development team apart from Stippi adding some gradients and a nice set of svg icons. I'd wager that once Haiku get's 3d acceleration (through Gallium most likely) we will see more entusiasm/effort going in to modernizing the look of the gui. Also there are the aforementioned decorators which allows third parties to customize the GUI and thus allowing for 'themes' to be made. As for the menu system, sure it may take nesting to the extreme, but seriously who launches their apps from the menu other than in extreme cases these days? I use shortcuts/launch icons for practically all the non cli apps I use and I doubt I am the exception. Currently the focus is on providing a stable, capable and performing system, once that is in place then making a better looking gui will be a piece of cake in my opinion ;)

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[5]: Strain
by WereCatf on Sun 22nd Aug 2010 14:59 in reply to "RE[4]: Strain"
WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

As for the menu system, sure it may take nesting to the extreme, but seriously who launches their apps from the menu other than in extreme cases these days? I use shortcuts/launch icons for practically all the non cli apps I use and I doubt I am the exception.

Truth be told, having the ability of using icons on the desktop is a really poor excuse for having a messed-up menu. First of all, if you happen to use lots of different applications and occasional gaming you'll end up with horribly cluttered desktop. Secondly, it still makes those cases where you have to dig in to menu any better.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Strain
by Valhalla on Sun 22nd Aug 2010 16:04 in reply to "RE[5]: Strain"
Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24


Truth be told, having the ability of using icons on the desktop is a really poor excuse for having a messed-up menu. First of all, if you happen to use lots of different applications and occasional gaming you'll end up with horribly cluttered desktop. Secondly, it still makes those cases where you have to dig in to menu any better.


But is it so bad? I mean for things like applications/preferences (which is what you will most likely launch) it's not a hell of alot of menu nesting is it? Certainly no more than launching applications from the windows start menu unless I am mistaken?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Strain
by axeld on Wed 25th Aug 2010 11:57 in reply to "RE[5]: Strain"
axeld Member since:
2005-07-07

I always wonder about comments like this about the right click navigation: it's an additional feature, it doesn't replace the other and usual means to reach your data or applications.

It's completely okay to dislike it, as no one forces you to use it. Just stay with what you know, other people happen to find this little feature exceptionally helpful at times.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: Strain
by bogomipz on Tue 24th Aug 2010 17:27 in reply to "RE[4]: Strain"
bogomipz Member since:
2005-07-11

apart from Stippi adding some gradients and a nice set of svg icons.


Those are not SVG icons! Stippi didn't just design some of the icons, but also invented a brand new file format. And this was actually a quite important improvement! The HVIF, or Haiku Vector Icon Format, is so compact that the icon usually fits in the file's inode in the file system. This means that the icon data is right there when a directory is to be listed, without first reading the content of separately stored icon files, bringing very welcome speed improvements. Rendering HVIF is also much, much faster than rendering a general purpose vector format, especially SVG which is XML based.

Some details on the format;

http://www.haiku-os.org/articles/2009-09-14_why_haiku_vector_icons_...

Reply Parent Score: 2