Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 20th Aug 2010 21:40 UTC, submitted by koki
BeOS & Derivatives This summer, too, the Haikuproject is part of the Google Summer of Code event. One of the more interesting projects is the Services Kit (draft document!) by Christophe "Shusui" Huriaux, which is an API to facilitate the creation of native web-enabled programs using standard web protocols and data exchange mechanisms.
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RE[6]: Forward thinking
by cb88 on Sun 22nd Aug 2010 19:01 UTC in reply to "RE[5]: Forward thinking"
cb88
Member since:
2009-04-23

Right its LGPL and closely tied to Linux/*nix systems...

other possibly more flexible alternatives should also be considered ... for the c++ libc++ might be usable and its designed to be flexible and compiler independant

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[7]: Forward thinking
by Fettarme H-Milch on Sun 22nd Aug 2010 21:11 in reply to "RE[6]: Forward thinking"
Fettarme H-Milch Member since:
2010-02-16

If the Haiku project aims for GPL-free development environment, Clang is the only potential alternative and that comes with its own C++ library.
As for a LibC..... I'd guess they'll adopt the one from FreeBSD or NetBSD at some point to get a BSDLed implementation.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Forward thinking
by Valhalla on Mon 23rd Aug 2010 01:32 in reply to "RE[7]: Forward thinking"
Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

If the Haiku project aims for GPL-free development environment, Clang is the only potential alternative and that comes with its own C++ library.
As for a LibC..... I'd guess they'll adopt the one from FreeBSD or NetBSD at some point to get a BSDLed implementation.


I don't see why they would aim for a 'GPL-free' development environment, the licence makes no difference in this case. For system bound code, naturally they need to avoid GPL. Whichever compiler they choose to ship Haiku with should be decided on a purely technical level in my opinion, which I'm sure the Haiku devs are very qualified to do. However, given that llvm has adopted the compiler flags from gcc it should be no problem for the user to work with whichever compiler he prefers (or different compilers for different projects) once llvm has matured sufficiently. From what I've gathered when skimming the mailing lists, llvm compiles Haiku (after some fixes) so the time when you can build haiku from top to bottom with both gcc and llvm might be very near.

Reply Parent Score: 2