Linked by Thom Holwerda on Thu 9th Sep 2010 14:08 UTC
Apple Very good news out of Cupertino just now. It took quite a bit of negative press, but Apple has finally caved in: the company is dropping its restriction on third-party development tools for iOS. Also, the company has published all its App Store review guidelines out in the open for the first time. It took a little too long, but very good news nonetheless.
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RE: Section 3.2.2
by JPowers27 on Thu 9th Sep 2010 15:48 UTC in reply to "Section 3.2.2"
JPowers27
Member since:
2008-07-30

Question: Why does Apple allow web browsers on iOS?

HTML is downloaded code...
JavaScript is downloaded code...
CSS could almost be called code...

Apple is supporting HTML5 which also includes:
* <canvas> which requires a JavaScript to do the drawing.
* MathML which is a coding standard for writing math formulas.

Most of the advances in HTML5 where around making the DOM easier to change via JavaScript and the addition of new events that can trigger JavaScript functions.

If you can't download code... How can you allow JavaScript in a browser?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Section 3.2.2
by robojerk on Thu 9th Sep 2010 16:14 in reply to "RE: Section 3.2.2"
robojerk Member since:
2006-01-10

Question: Why does Apple allow web browsers on iOS?

HTML is downloaded code...
JavaScript is downloaded code...
CSS could almost be called code...

Apple is supporting HTML5 which also includes:
* which requires a JavaScript to do the drawing.
* MathML which is a coding standard for writing math formulas.

Most of the advances in HTML5 where around making the DOM easier to change via JavaScript and the addition of new events that can trigger JavaScript functions.

If you can't download code... How can you allow JavaScript in a browser?

I believe Safari is exempt. No Chrome, Firefox, or Opera allowed, at least natively.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Section 3.2.2
by wargum on Thu 9th Sep 2010 16:39 in reply to "RE: Section 3.2.2"
wargum Member since:
2006-12-15

From daringfireball:

3.3.2 An Application may not download or install executable code. Interpreted code may only be used in an Application if all scripts, code and interpreters are packaged in the Application and not downloaded. The only exception to the foregoing is scripts and code downloaded and run by Appleā€™s built-in WebKit framework.

BTW: HTML is definitely NOT code! ;)

So, same as before, no other browser engines.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Section 3.2.2
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Thu 9th Sep 2010 18:22 in reply to "RE[2]: Section 3.2.2"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

HTML should not be code. But that didn't stop them from doing this:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Htmlscript

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[3]: Section 3.2.2
by henderson101 on Fri 10th Sep 2010 11:29 in reply to "RE[2]: Section 3.2.2"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

From daringfireball:
<snip>


Yeah, I already quoted most of that. Why did you miss it...? oh, OS News readers decided to vote it down.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Section 3.2.2
by tyrione on Thu 9th Sep 2010 22:45 in reply to "RE: Section 3.2.2"
tyrione Member since:
2005-11-21

Question: Why does Apple allow web browsers on iOS?

HTML is downloaded code...
JavaScript is downloaded code...
CSS could almost be called code...

Apple is supporting HTML5 which also includes:
* which requires a JavaScript to do the drawing.
* MathML which is a coding standard for writing math formulas.

Most of the advances in HTML5 where around making the DOM easier to change via JavaScript and the addition of new events that can trigger JavaScript functions.

If you can't download code... How can you allow JavaScript in a browser?


Include sanctioned Javascript libraries that work and are certified by WebKit, as part of your application package?

Reply Parent Score: 2