Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 10th Sep 2010 16:06 UTC
Apple Yesterday's back-pedaling from Apple has been very well received in the industry. Two companies who were bitten pretty hard by Apple's policies - Google (through AdMob) and Adobe - have both responded to yesterday's changes, and as you can expect, they're both pretty happy.
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hmm
by poundsmack on Fri 10th Sep 2010 19:02 UTC
poundsmack
Member since:
2005-07-13

android became a bigger threat that apple imagined. i am sure apple had thought the industry would have given up on flash and such by the time a competitor came out with something to rival the iPhone. but apple was wrong, and android is a bigger threat. now they have to do this to compete evenly. i am glad they changed their mind, even if it was only due to being pushed into it...

Reply Score: 4

RE: hmm
by techweenie1 on Fri 10th Sep 2010 19:41 in reply to "hmm"
techweenie1 Member since:
2008-10-15

Now if only they would license iOS to other devices...like Google is doing with Android, but seeing as they won't even do that with Mac OS X, I think hell will freeze over before such a decision is made.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: hmm
by Tony Swash on Fri 10th Sep 2010 19:43 in reply to "hmm"
Tony Swash Member since:
2009-08-22

android became a bigger threat that apple imagined. i am sure apple had thought the industry would have given up on flash and such by the time a competitor came out with something to rival the iPhone. but apple was wrong, and android is a bigger threat. now they have to do this to compete evenly. i am glad they changed their mind, even if it was only due to being pushed into it...


The thing is if, this was a sign of weakness then presumeably it would be a weakness on the App front. This after all is a measure likely to increase or broaden the number of apps on the iPhone from different sources. If Apple really did feel pressured into doing this then it would logically have to be because they felt pressure in relations to the comparative app situation of iOS in relation to other platforms such as Android.

The problem is that there is not the slightest evidence that Apple is feeling competitive pressure on the App front. Apple's App Store still has lots more Apps than its nearest competitors, developers are still making a lot (really a lot) more money on the App Store than on any other platform, the Apple App development framework continues to be updated, improved and highly appreciated by developers.

So where is the pressure on Apple on the App front?

My feeling is that this is a tidying up of the rules once Apple had a look at the various issues it was concerned about and decided it was not particularly threatened by some of stuff it had previously blocked and which had brought bad PR. Its still not supporting Flash content itself and the new rules still block development frameworks like Adobe's AIR that try to use unsupported APIs. The Flash based development framework legalised by this rule change uses official API's through the correct Objective C frameworks.

Apple blocked the cross platform development frameworks to prevent poor quality apps being developed and to prevent future lose of control of the development process. The new rules still block the AIR type crap which would have used unofficial APIs directly accessing the ARM architecture and thus would have significantly eroded Apple's control of the development cycle of its own platform. Its the latter point that is the most important. As long as cross platform developers use approved APIs Apple is OK to see them go ahead.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Baloney Sandwich!
by Bill Shooter of Bul on Fri 10th Sep 2010 20:17 in reply to "RE: hmm"
Bill Shooter of Bul Member since:
2006-07-14

Those rules were anti competitive., monopolistic BS, that only works to your advantage if you have a stable monopoly. They don't. Plus the FTC came sniffing around.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: hmm
by mutantsushi on Fri 10th Sep 2010 21:03 in reply to "RE: hmm"
mutantsushi Member since:
2006-08-18

The new rules still block the AIR type crap which would have used unofficial APIs directly accessing the ARM architecture and thus would have significantly eroded Apple's control of the development cycle of its own platform. Its the latter point that is the most important. As long as cross platform developers use approved APIs Apple is OK to see them go ahead.
This is the point, and what makes all the Apple apologists´ smoke screen look even stupider now. AIR was/is crap along with Flash, and I´m completely happy for it not to be available on iOS. It´s still not available, so the 3.3.1 change is revealed to be the utter retrograde move it was.

The fact is that Apple itself is funding development of Cocoa/iOS development models using non-3.3.1-approved-languages (MacRuby). If they´re doing it, one has to say that there must be SOME value in taking a different angle on Cocoa than the current plain vanilla Obj-C approach. MonoTouch and several other projects do not BYPASS Cocoa/Obj-C, but ENRICH IT by providing means which may be more suitable for different projects. And then the whole Lua script thing, i.e. Apple would never have equitably enforced 3.3.1 in the first place. 3.3.2 now allowing (app-contained) interpreted code (any code, you just can´t link to unofficial APIs) is a breath of fresh air.

Anyways, not to bash on Apple too much, it now looks like a more or less reasonable situation now, at least y´know, besides Apple preventing carrier unlocking and alternatives to the App Store in the first place.

Edited 2010-09-10 21:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: hmm
by BallmerKnowsBest on Sat 11th Sep 2010 18:42 in reply to "RE: hmm"
BallmerKnowsBest Member since:
2008-06-02

The thing is if, this was a sign of weakness then presumeably it would be a weakness on the App front.


So how many times are you going to repeat the same post?

http://www.osnews.com/permalink?440364
http://www.osnews.com/permalink?440277
http://www.osnews.com/permalink?440103

Ah, there's nothing like the smell of stale copypasta in the morning.

This after all is a measure likely to increase or broaden the number of apps on the iPhone from different sources. If Apple really did feel pressured into doing this then it would logically have to be because they felt pressure in relations to the comparative app situation of iOS in relation to other platforms such as Android.


That, OR someone at Apple possesses the 2 or 3 braincells required to understand a few basic facts:

- Android-powered phones have overtaken the iPhone, and that lead is steadily increasing
- commercial developers go where the users are
- if a platform has a greater number of users, then eventually it will have a greater number of applications

Clearly someone at Apple can read the handwriting on the wall, even if you're unable (or unwilling?) to.

The problem is that there is not the slightest evidence that Apple is feeling competitive pressure on the App front.


Sure, if you completely ignore the 180-degree flip-flop that Apple has just done... on a policy they introduced barely 6 months ago. And the fact that it comes about a month after Android has officially left the iPhone in the dust? I guess that must just be a huge coincidence.

Reply Parent Score: 2