Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 14th Sep 2010 21:21 UTC
Multimedia, AV If the rumours are true, and if this Pastebin post (be sure to mirror the key if that won't get you in trouble with your authorities) is legitimate, then it looks like High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection has been cracked so hard its mother's mother felt it. HDCP is a copy protection mechanism which protects the audio and video streams sent over DisplayPort, HDMI, and DVI.
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RE: Newtons's law
by apoclypse on Tue 14th Sep 2010 22:06 UTC in reply to "Newtons's law"
apoclypse
Member since:
2007-02-17

Bullshit! That's just something pirates say to justify themselves. The only price they are willing to pay is free. Even if things were "fairly" priced, they would still pirate anyway and make up another excuse.

Who gives a shit if the big wig studios are lining their fat wallets. What does that have to do with paying for content that you consume? You seem to enjoy the content either way, but its not just to compensate the ones making the content because you are to cheap pay for it?

Edited 2010-09-14 22:09 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[2]: Newtons's law
by Vide on Tue 14th Sep 2010 22:36 in reply to "RE: Newtons's law"
Vide Member since:
2006-02-17

Bullshit! That's just something pirates say to justify themselves. The only price they are willing to pay is free. Even if things were "fairly" priced, they would still pirate anyway and make up another excuse.


Not entirely true. I mean, obviously there are tons of hardcore freeriders who aren't going to pay a cent anyway, but still in the age of VHS there were lots of people renting movies. And it still happens today. Just look at Spotify... 5$ month and you can listen to almost (ok, there are exceptions) everything whenever (and wherever, for 10$/month) you want.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: Newtons's law
by jgagnon on Wed 15th Sep 2010 12:30 in reply to "RE[2]: Newtons's law"
jgagnon Member since:
2008-06-24

In the VHS days, the (home) pirates were renting and copying, never to rent or buy again. As was said, there will always be people who feel they deserve whatever they want for free.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Newtons's law
by phoenix on Tue 14th Sep 2010 22:50 in reply to "RE: Newtons's law"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

It's not so much the price as the convenience factor that matters most.

There's a lot of content out there that I would gladly fork over money for ... if it didn't require jumping through hoops to get it to play on my hardware/software, at the time(s) when I want it to.

There's also a lot of content out there that is no longer available for purchase from any legit sources. I can't send the big wigs any money, as they no longer make the product available. If I could, I would buy it.

I have no problem with spending money on content ... but I won't spend hours/days looking for it, nor will I spend hours/days getting my system(s) setup to play it, nor will I go through the hassle of all the forced DRM/ads/warnings/etc.

Make it easy and convenient to use/play/watch/listen, and I will send money just as easily. Make it hard and inconvenient, and I'll go to a more convenient source.

Simple as that.

Reply Parent Score: 7

RE[2]: Newtons's law
by rom508 on Tue 14th Sep 2010 23:15 in reply to "RE: Newtons's law"
rom508 Member since:
2007-04-20

Ask yourself how many people are pirating newspapers or magazines? They are sold in vast quantities, but the hassle of making illegal copies far outweighs the action of buying the real thing.

And also, I personally don't pirate (or download) music or films, I just don't buy them if I don't like the price. I haven't bought a CD, MP3 file, or DVD for the last 2 years. If you make content cheap, accessible and unrestricted then people like me may change our habits and start buying music or films.

I know nobody gives a fcuk about my opinion and the film/music industry is not going to change any time soon. You know what, I can live without music or films, I'll spend my money on other things.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Newtons's law
by galvanash on Wed 15th Sep 2010 00:29 in reply to "RE: Newtons's law"
galvanash Member since:
2006-01-25

Bullshit! That's just something pirates say to justify themselves. The only price they are willing to pay is free. Even if things were "fairly" priced, they would still pirate anyway and make up another excuse.


Bullshit right back! It isn't the price that makes what the studios are peddling worthless - it is specifically the absolute unavailability of what people actually want... I want to be able to buy a movie or a TV show in digital HD quality and be able to do whatever I want with it short of giving it away. I want to be able to copy it to any device I see fit for viewing it whenever I want and as often as I want. Put it on my iPad - check. Put it on my HTPC - check. Transcode it for my iPhone - check. I don't want to buy some device form them to "allow" me to do this - I just want the fricken content...

The problem is the studios don't sell the product I want at ANY price. Show me a legal way to do this that won't require me to jump through stupid hoops... There isn't one because they don't want to sell movies and TV shows, they want to sell MEDIA. And when the media isn't in the format you want - they want you to buy it again. And again. And again... Well screw that - I don't want to buy media, I want to buy content. As soon as someone starts selling content Ill buy some.

I mean the music industry at least to some degree has gotten a clue (although I would rather flac - I can live with high bitrate MP3 or AAC as long as it isn't DRM'd).

Reply Parent Score: 12

RE[2]: Newtons's law
by Kivada on Wed 15th Sep 2010 05:34 in reply to "RE: Newtons's law"
Kivada Member since:
2010-07-07

Bullshit yourself bud, I'm fully willing to pay up to $1 to rent and do from the redbox ass they are everywhere around here makng them convenient.

But I refuse to pay anything for a potentially shitty movie and will never pay anything for a censored anything. I want the complete unabridged version, "teh children" be damned.

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: Newtons's law
by amadensor on Wed 15th Sep 2010 15:34 in reply to "RE: Newtons's law"
amadensor Member since:
2006-04-10

Not true. Once Netflix streaming got a decent catalog, and Hulu is showing the episodes I missed, I stopped using torrent.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Newtons's law - infringement
by jabbotts on Wed 15th Sep 2010 18:07 in reply to "RE: Newtons's law"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

.. it's copyright infringement not piracy. Pirates are still badly dressed people raiding ships at gunpoint. People infringing copywrite are "playing at piracy" at best. No need to romantisize copywrite infringement to get mroe kids interested in it (even RIAA realizes that they've just romantisized it).

But, my real point in responding; there will always be people only willing to pay "free" dollars for anything. They go out of there way to take things from stores without paying. They go out of there way to take digital data without paying. Nothing new here. The media companies could chose a more appropriate price point for there products and make honorable customers out of all but the minority who would only ever accept "free".

Same thing happens with other products. If you price yourself too high for the market, you loose paying customers. Price your product reasonably for the market and you gain paying customers.

This is one of the rare cases where "what the market will bare" is biting the vendors back. Normally that price strategy means "gouge 'em for all we can get" but in this case, the market is clearly not willing to pay the asking price for a lump of plastic and all the effort RIAA goes into to crush fair use and sell you the same content in multiple formats.

I'm not justifying copyright infringement. I'm suggesting that the automatic response to questioning the content providers shouldn't be "oh, just another criminal that won't pay for our products at any price".

Reply Parent Score: 2