Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 14th Sep 2010 21:21 UTC
Multimedia, AV If the rumours are true, and if this Pastebin post (be sure to mirror the key if that won't get you in trouble with your authorities) is legitimate, then it looks like High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection has been cracked so hard its mother's mother felt it. HDCP is a copy protection mechanism which protects the audio and video streams sent over DisplayPort, HDMI, and DVI.
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DRM is still effective
by earksiinni on Wed 15th Sep 2010 03:30 UTC
earksiinni
Member since:
2009-03-27

I don't know why everyone is proclaiming this as a blow for DRM. The paper proving the possibility of cracking HDCP was published in 2001, meaning it took 9 years for a crack to emerge. 9 years in tech is like ancient Rome.

If I were an industry executive at Intel, I'd be popping open champaign bottles and patting myself on the back for having planned such a resilient DRM scheme. For some reason, everyone thinks that DRM is meant to control your media forever. Says who? These companies are profitable for a reason, and I'm sure that executives make a cost/benefit analysis and factor in the expected lifetime of DRM schemes. For all we know, 9 years has wildly surpassed all expectations.

This is to leave aside the fact that most people don't exploit DRM cracks and that media industries (except for print) are still incredibly profitable.

Reply Score: 4

RE: DRM is still effective
by agildehaus on Wed 15th Sep 2010 04:54 in reply to "DRM is still effective"
agildehaus Member since:
2005-06-29

To be fair, HDCP has never been a high priority. Why bother with it when AACS has been rendered useless? Who wants to capture in real-time and deal with audio sync when the streams can be ripped in their original form straight off the disc?

I suppose this will make high-def TV capture easier and of higher-quality, but with the analogue loophole HDCP has never been a hurdle there either. There's not much quality missing from a high-def capture off component video. The hardware to do it costs next to nothing today.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE: DRM is still effective
by UltraZelda64 on Wed 15th Sep 2010 04:55 in reply to "DRM is still effective"
UltraZelda64 Member since:
2006-12-05

While 9 years is a a long time as far as technology goes, at least hardware and to a lesser extent software... it's not for media/storage formats. How long has the audio CD been around? Or the video DVD? As with any other format, they intend Blu-ray to last just about as long once it picks up. And IMO, it hasn't even really picked up yet. And already, one of its primary DRM systems is totally f***ed. Hasn't AACS been cracked as well, a while back? I thought I read something about that.

So yeah, I would consider this a major blow to the DRM guys; next thing you know, they'll put some new type of DRM or other copy protection on their movies, which will lock out all current players, just because it's so damn broken right now. Or else, every Blu-ray disc will easily be cracked until it's replaced with something else... which is most likely going to be a hell of a long time.

DRM... as always, a major failure. Yet people still defend it?

Edited 2010-09-15 04:57 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: DRM is still effective
by WorknMan on Wed 15th Sep 2010 05:20 in reply to "RE: DRM is still effective"
WorknMan Member since:
2005-11-13

As with any other format, they intend Blu-ray to last just about as long once it picks up. And IMO, it hasn't even really picked up yet.


Yeah, not really. Among its other problems, I'm not too keen on buying a movie-playing device that has to constantly phone home to some faceless corporate entity in order to make sure I have permission to play the movie I just bought. And having to constantly update the firmware on the device is enough to make my parents not interested in messing with it either.

In short, I'll stick with DVDs.

Edited 2010-09-15 05:21 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

RE[2]: DRM is still effective
by earksiinni on Wed 15th Sep 2010 06:13 in reply to "RE: DRM is still effective"
earksiinni Member since:
2009-03-27

As with any other format, they intend Blu-ray to last just about as long once it picks up.


You don't know that. My point is that everyone on these and other tech-oriented forums looks at DRM from an engineering perspective, as if the effectiveness of DRM should be judged by whether it's cracked or not. I'm pretty sure that after years of DRM schemes being cracked, the industry is aware that any DRM will be cracked; anything stated in public to the contrary is pure rhetoric, we shouldn't be so naive as to believe that when a company states that their encryption is unbreakable that they actually mean that. Confidence is half the battle.

Companies work with numbers and metrics, not absolutes. For all we know, nine years is well beyond what they expected.

Moreover, who are "they"? Many actors are involved, all with different interests. Don't you think that there are certain parties who would very well like to see new standards constantly created because it would be profitable for them? Maybe "they" intend for DRM to be vulnerable to keep up the need for new DRM regimes.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: DRM is still effective
by Soulbender on Wed 15th Sep 2010 05:43 in reply to "DRM is still effective"
Soulbender Member since:
2005-08-18

media industries (except for print) are still incredibly profitable.


Are you sure about that? because what we're hearing from them is nothing but whining about how much piracy is bleeidng them dry and how they whole industry might collapse.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: DRM is still effective
by earksiinni on Wed 15th Sep 2010 06:04 in reply to "RE: DRM is still effective"
earksiinni Member since:
2009-03-27

Lol, exactly.

(Er...I'm interpreting your comment as sarcasm. The interwebs are bad for that.)

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: DRM is still effective
by ndrw on Wed 15th Sep 2010 06:13 in reply to "DRM is still effective"
ndrw Member since:
2009-06-30

It would be better if it failed back in 2001, when there were no millions of devices in the field and whole operating systems and "media protection stacks" built around an idea of "safe digital interfaces".

Or if it failed in 2020, when people would likely be using something else.

Breaking it in 2010 is a killer - you can't withdraw from it, can't fix it and there is a whole lot of content that used to depend on the perceived safety waiting for being ripped off.

It's not really that surprising. In 2001 or 2020 no one would bother breaking it. In 2010 it makes a lot of sense.

Reply Parent Score: 4

RE[2]: DRM is still effective
by r_a_trip on Thu 16th Sep 2010 14:39 in reply to "RE: DRM is still effective"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

Except that breaking HDCP isn't that spectacular. The Goose with the golden eggs was AACS. AACS was introduced 2005 and in 2007 it was already cracked. Downloading Full HD movies has been perfectly feasible for a couple of years. Cracking HDCP was just adding the finishing touch.

It's time the content industry starts looking at optimum curves for their pricing. BluRay is prettier, but it's not 200% more pretty than DVD and I think the pricing should reflect that. On top of that, more pixels doesn't mean more story. A crappy movie won't become a blockbuster just because BluRay gives you the opportunity to count the hairs on the upper lip of the heroine.

Reply Parent Score: 2