Linked by mjhi11 on Thu 16th Sep 2010 20:13 UTC
Apple I love OSNews, but it does seem like some of its editors enjoy just a little too much taking a good natured jab at Apple upon occasion (well, more like every chance that particular editor can get). I thought it time for a little good news and analysis about Apple that critics often overlook.
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Comment by Tuishimi
by Tuishimi on Thu 16th Sep 2010 20:27 UTC
Tuishimi
Member since:
2005-07-06

Apple has always taken a beating for the so-called "Apple Tax" the premium customers pay over similarly equipped PCs.


I built a Mac Pro Clone for $1500 a year or so ago. It actually ran OS X for awhile, until I had to go Windows for work.

These network related advances have revolutionized networking, making what was once difficult, painfully simple.

There are other wireless routers that come with easy-to-use software. While I have, and use, 4 Apple wireless routers in my home (overkill a little - but we get a lot of radio interference in our area) I would not hesitate to purchase another brand.

Reply Score: 2

RE: Comment by Tuishimi
by No it isnt on Thu 16th Sep 2010 21:06 in reply to "Comment by Tuishimi"
No it isnt Member since:
2005-11-14

Apple is only priced "fair" if you treat it as a standard and look for a PC with the exact same specs. If you think rationally, on the other hand, and spec a system for what kind of performance you need, Apple is usually hideously expensive, and even worse when you consider the cost of upgrades.

I know a Mac would cost more than twice the price of my current PC if I were to go that route, and its performance would still be worse. Then again, I only wanted to be able to play GTA4.

Reply Parent Score: 9

RE[2]: Comment by Tuishimi
by Thom_Holwerda on Thu 16th Sep 2010 21:11 in reply to "RE: Comment by Tuishimi"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

The problem is more often that Apple tends to make weird combinations to save money - big-ass processor, yet crappy and too little RAM, sub-standard hard drives, underpowered video cards, and so on.

That being said, Apple rules the roost when it comes to laptops (although HP's Envy line is comparable now, I just haven't ever seen one here) and the iMacs. Best computers you can recommended to friends and family.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Tuishimi
by marsofearth on Sun 19th Sep 2010 17:15 in reply to "RE: Comment by Tuishimi"
marsofearth Member since:
2009-12-13

I know a Mac would cost more than twice the price of my current PC if I were to go that route, and its performance would still be worse.

Suggesting that a macintosh uses lower system specs than your "PC" for twice the price.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: Comment by Tuishimi
by kaiwai on Sat 18th Sep 2010 01:34 in reply to "Comment by Tuishimi"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I built a Mac Pro Clone for $1500 a year or so ago. It actually ran OS X for awhile, until I had to go Windows for work.


Where you could easily get a iMac to do the same job - if you bought a maxed out iMac, in 4-5 years time it would do its job well over that time span. I'm sure you'll bring about 'piecemeal upgrades' but when you add those up you're no better off at the end of 4-5 years that if you kept with an iMac and did a total replacement.

I'm sitting on my iMac 2.66Ghz, Radeon 2600 HD, 4GB RAM, 1TB HDD (upgraded recently) etc. and I could easily see myself using it for another 2 years thus making the total life span 4 years. Thats a pretty good life span for a desktop if you ask me.

There are other wireless routers that come with easy-to-use software. While I have, and use, 4 Apple wireless routers in my home (overkill a little - but we get a lot of radio interference in our area) I would not hesitate to purchase another brand.


Yes, and software that use weird proprietary and buggy drivers when compared to Apple that uses bonjour, CUPS and so on. I have an Airport Extreme upstairs (dual channel) and before that I went through something like 4 routers in a couple of days with each of the routers having some issue with their firmware, signal and so forth. When coupled with the software provided I can share the printers easily, I can share files over AFP where SMB was a complete nightmare being a hit or miss whether other PC's pick up the shares. There are benefits to a vertically integrated business but too bad people ignore those benefits for what they perceive as 'freedom'.

Edited 2010-09-18 01:38 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Tuishimi
by Tuishimi on Sat 18th Sep 2010 03:56 in reply to "RE: Comment by Tuishimi"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06


Where you could easily get a iMac to do the same job - if you bought a maxed out iMac, in 4-5 years time it would do its job well over that time span. I'm sure you'll bring about 'piecemeal upgrades' but when you add those up you're no better off at the end of 4-5 years that if you kept with an iMac and did a total replacement.


What? As a work machine running windows 7? No? I built the equivalent of a mac pro in computing power (quad core, ATI 5850, 8 GB RAM, 3 TB of disk space, etc.) but was then required to switch to Windows so I switched to running Windows 7 full time on it. I am a software engineer and the more cores and the more memory I have the better when I am building apps and running several different web servers at a time.

Don't get me wrong, My son has my old Intel iMac, and my daughter has my old G5 iMac... I keep them and use them. I'm just saying I was able to build the equivalent of a Mac Pro for $1500. Period.

Yes, and software that use weird proprietary and buggy drivers when compared to Apple that uses bonjour, CUPS and so on.


You know, I don't know exactly what you are trying to get out (in reference to the rest of your post that I chopped out)... My household uses macs. We have:

4 Apple routers
1 iPhone
2 iPods
1 Intel iMac
1 G5 iMac
1 Macbook
and one old G4 Mac Mini.

My point was that the author is stretching HIS points a little. You can have the equivalent computing power for less money. Maybe not for better style, but for less money. As far as durability goes, I chose my components carefully and still spent far less money than I would have on the Mac Pro. Looks good, but when I build my own machine I know what goes in it, I am able to apply better cooling mechanisms, and while it isn't as pretty, my Cooler Master case isn't have bad looking, and is pretty functional.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Tuishimi
by JAlexoid on Sun 19th Sep 2010 19:16 in reply to "RE: Comment by Tuishimi"
JAlexoid Member since:
2009-05-19

There are benefits to a vertically integrated business but too bad people ignore those benefits for what they perceive as 'freedom'.


Then you should try Microsoft's vertical integration, witch beats anything that Apple has to offer every time.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Comment by Tuishimi
by Tuishimi on Tue 21st Sep 2010 22:39 in reply to "RE: Comment by Tuishimi"
Tuishimi Member since:
2005-07-06

"I built a Mac Pro Clone for $1500 a year or so ago. It actually ran OS X for awhile, until I had to go Windows for work.


Where you could easily get a iMac to do the same job - if you bought a maxed out iMac, in 4-5 years time it would do its job well over that time span. I'm sure you'll bring about 'piecemeal upgrades' but when you add those up you're no better off at the end of 4-5 years that if you kept with an iMac and did a total replacement.
"

See? Right here you are making assumptions that you know what I need or don't need to do my job. And it is OFF-TOPIC to boot. I said I built a mac pro clone for $1500 and suddenly you are off saying I don't need a mac pro (even tho' at this point you have no idea what I do for a living) and could do my job more cheaply with an imac. Well here is some more news for you... what are the price ranges for the iMac? For the second range iMac I built something more powerful (and yes, powerful in the sense that it has much more disk space, a CPU that can handle more threads at a time, double the ram, etc.)

I'm sitting on my iMac 2.66Ghz, Radeon 2600 HD, 4GB RAM, 1TB HDD (upgraded recently) etc. and I could easily see myself using it for another 2 years thus making the total life span 4 years. Thats a pretty good life span for a desktop if you ask me.


That's awesome! I am so happy for you! Really. Again, what's that have to do with me building a mac pro clone for $1500?

Yes, and software that use weird proprietary and buggy drivers when compared to Apple that uses bonjour, CUPS and so on.


You mean weird proprietary code/drivers that fit with Windows, the virtually ubiquitous operating system in most of the civilized world?

I have an Airport Extreme upstairs (dual channel) and before that I went through something like 4 routers in a couple of days with each of the routers having some issue with their firmware, signal and so forth.


You seem to be an unlucky fellow as I cannot count on one hand the hardware failures I've had with my computers over the past 15 years. All the computers I've built and the Macs I've owned prior to the current set have been given to family members or sold on craigslist or ebay for a fair sum. I still have my scallop-shaped airport from at least 6 years ago. I also have an HP scanner and my wife has an HP PSC that are at least 3 years old. They still work. I guess I should consider myself lucky.

Reply Parent Score: 2