Linked by mjhi11 on Thu 16th Sep 2010 20:13 UTC
Apple I love OSNews, but it does seem like some of its editors enjoy just a little too much taking a good natured jab at Apple upon occasion (well, more like every chance that particular editor can get). I thought it time for a little good news and analysis about Apple that critics often overlook.
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NeoX
Member since:
2006-02-19

Program installation needs work


Really? As was mentioned, drag and drop installation is easy enough and without all the DLL and system files scattered all over like many Windows apps do. If a Mac app comes with an installer it is usually with the built-in system installer that gives you some cool flexibility like using the Show Files.. menu item to see exactly what is being installed and where. I only wish Windows installers were so transparent.


the dock gets annoying if you have a lot of programs open


It can be annoying if you have a ton of junk in there. I keep mine pretty lean.


and the entire system was built with a needless aversion towards right clicking.


Since the first version of OS X I have been using the right mouse button. You only need to enable it in the prefs for some mice. Other HID compliant mice it just works. I use a logitech.

Reply Parent Score: 1

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Really? As was mentioned, drag and drop installation is easy enough and without all the DLL and system files scattered all over like many Windows apps do.


DLL hell is no longer an issue and OSX is certainly good for encouraging application portability. The actual storage of the program is not the problem. The problem is with the multiple installation methods that can throw off novice users, especially if they are used to just double clicking an exe.


It can be annoying if you have a ton of junk in there. I keep mine pretty lean.

I find it annoying that clicking a red button in the corner doesn't actually close the program. I shouldn't have to specify exit or quit if there is no file loaded within that program. It's a system that would make more sense if all programs had long loading times. But more often you just want to open and close a program quickly and not have it marked in the dock. Yes I know about keyboard shortcuts but I shouldn't have to touch the keyboard or move the mouse through a menu to kill a window. It also isn't as good as Win7 at previewing what you have open especially if you have multiple files opened by the same program.

Dock and quartz were certainly slick looking compared to XP but there is still room for improvement.


Since the first version of OS X I have been using the right mouse button. You only need to enable it in the prefs for some mice. Other HID compliant mice it just works. I use a logitech.


I use a logitech mouse as well but that isn't the problem. As I said earlier the problem is that the system is designed around a one button mouse. There are too many cases where right-click does nothing.

Now there are aspects of OSX that I like such as the config menu, Unix services, program isolation and better integration with idevices.

But for raw productivity I believe Win7 has the edge for users who work with lots of programs and files. However I think OSX is good for problem users who are prone to picking up malware.

Reply Parent Score: 2

mjhi11 Member since:
2009-08-15

I'm totally with you on the red close button though...I hate when I close out the last window of a program the application still stays running. On the other hand when I recognize it a quick right mouse click (oops), Quit on the dock icon gets rid of the offending application. And the green button drives me batty as I'm never for sure how the window is going to resize between semi-full screen (another annoyance) and supposed full screen (which is anything but).

With Spaces, Apple really missed an opportunity to allow true, single application FULL SCREEN mode. Its awesome in Fusion that I can set Windows 7 Aero to launch and run full screen and never know I'm even running OS X, until I use the "Magic" 3 finger click to switch spaces, but then I'd love to get a little more screen real estate to run a true full screen Screen Sharing/VNC client in the third space and save a little on my next Lasik procedure!

Reply Parent Score: 1

NeoX Member since:
2006-02-19

I use a logitech mouse as well but that isn't the problem. As I said earlier the problem is that the system is designed around a one button mouse. There are too many cases where right-click does nothing.


I gotcha. I guess I have not run into this. All the apps I use that have context menus work with right click as expected.

As to the Red close box not actually quitting the application, IIRC this is a carryover from the classic OS days. I believe it also the expected way an app is to function on a Mac and again, IIRC part of Apple's guidelines for developers. Of course if an app has a single window and us utility in nature there is no reason a developer can't allow the app to quit when the red close is clicked in the last window.

Reply Parent Score: 1

mjhi11 Member since:
2009-08-15

I do have a solution to the Dock issue, organize your applications in related folders. Then, drag the Mac Applications folder to the Dock. Pretty much an instant "Start Menu". And since I run both Windows 7 Aero and OS X in real-time on my Mac using VMWare Fusion using the multiple screen Spaces utility which allows me to quickly switch between environments (with a tripple click of my Mighty Mouse!).

So I have both on my Mac and my PC an Accessories folder which includes the calculator, calendar, address book, Write/Text Edit, and other "desk accessory" type tools that ship with both OSs, a Business folder with business applications, a Tools menu for utilities, a Multimedia folder for media applications and a Web Design folder for my web development programs, tools and utilities.

As for the 5 or so most important applications I use daily, they go on the dock in OS X and I pin them to the Task Bar in Windows.

Navigating my programs, though different between platforms, is equally efficient whether I'm using OS X or Windows...Start, All programs, program folder, program. And in OS X, applications icon on the dock, application folder, application.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Shkaba Member since:
2006-06-22

... And since I run both Windows 7 Aero and OS X in real-time on my Mac using VMWare Fusion using the multiple screen Spaces utility which allows me to quickly switch between environments (with a tripple click of my Mighty Mouse!)...


This is the second time you are mentioning this as if you are trying to impress or infer that you are some sort of "ubergeek" or something. Couldn't care less for your configuration. Once upon a time (early '80) I used to be impressed, like when we installed disc units on IBM mainframe they were 1MB and the size of a fridge.

Apple is rotten. No way around this fact. It starts with a paranoid schizophrenic maniac that runs his business like a dictatorship, conveniently choosing to forget "1984" add they used not so long ago. Reneging on warranties (Applecare, external iphone water indicators ...), senseless license agreements (iphone eula, developers agreements, application rules ...), pushing faulty equipment for sale (iphone 4), attempt to control content on the internet (DRM, appstore, .h264, etc) and list goes on ... and on...

While they were sitting on the margins they couldn't afford such liberties, but now thanks to users who subscribe to preachings of mr. jobs and who can't see the forest because of a tree they've outdone microsoft in terms of being evil.

Reply Parent Score: 2

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Organizing common programs isn't the problem, it's managing large amounts of files and programs and previewing what you have open.

I would go over in detail how Win7 is better in this area for productivity but Gizmondo already did a pretty good job:
http://gizmodo.com/5131933/giz-explains-why-the-windows-7-taskbar-b...

Edited 2010-09-17 23:42 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2