Linked by Thom Holwerda on Sun 19th Sep 2010 21:18 UTC, submitted by gireesh
Mandriva, Mandrake, Lycoris It's been a troubling couple of weeks for Mandriva, but I decided not to report on it since I found it hard to unravel the events leading up to all this. Now, though, the story has come to its (logical) conclusion: now that most of Mandriva's employees have been laid off, they came together and forked Mandriva. Enter Mageia.
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RE: Linux distro #37264828737
by lemur2 on Mon 20th Sep 2010 00:39 UTC in reply to "Linux distro #37264828737"
lemur2
Member since:
2007-02-17

At some point there will be more Linux distros than users.


Oh dear, you aren't on about that again are you?

Here, do yourself a favour and do some reading:
http://broadcast.oreilly.com/2010/09/debunking-the-1-myth.html

If we do the math we find that due to netbooks alone Linux captured nearly 6% of the desktop market in 2009.


Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer. Using a slide to visualize OS market share Ballmer had Linux desktop market share as a slightly larger slice of the pie than MacOS.


Rather than simply believe whatever rubbish you are spoon-fed, educate yourself a little beyond what the media-marketing-powers-that-be want you to believe.

BTW: If you are having trouble deciding on a Linux distribution to use, just choose one upon which others base themselves. There are really only four choices: Debian, RedHat, OpenSuSe and Slackware.

ReHat is primarily for servers (use CentOS if you don't need paid support). SuSe is being sold. Slackware isn't all that user-friendly, and it is getting a bit long in the tooth now.

That leaves debian/Ubuntu. Debian is more stable in its "stable" long-term-support version (currently, this is Lenny), but less user-friendly and has less of a following, so online help isn't as prevalent. Use the MEPIS distribution if you opt for Debian, to help a bit in the user-friendliness department.

http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=mepis

The best choice for a Linux desktop at this time is thus, probably, Ubuntu LTS (aka Ubuntu 10.04, or Ubuntu Lucid Lynx). This distribution comes in KDE, GNOME, XFCE and LXDE flavours, going from the most powerful desktop down to the most lightweight. Choose one depending on the relative capability (or lack of age, if you will) of your hardware. If you have high-end or relatively recent hardware, and/or you are very familiar with Windows, then KDE will probably represent the best choice of desktop, otherwise choose GNOME unless your hardware is relatively old or under-powered, in which case the LXDE variant is probably your best bet ("Lubuntu" is the name of the Ubuntu variant you want for LXDE).

http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=lubuntu

Edited 2010-09-20 00:46 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

WereCatf Member since:
2006-02-15

Oh dear, you aren't on about that again are you?

Here, do yourself a favour and do some reading:
http://broadcast.oreilly.com/2010/09/debunking-the-1-myth.html


I don't think he was referring to the amount of people using Linux but instead to the huge amount of distros there are. Atleast it sounds like that to my ear.

Reply Parent Score: 5

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

I don't think he was referring to the amount of people using Linux but instead to the huge amount of distros there are. Atleast it sounds like that to my ear.


nt_jerkface:
At some point there will be more Linux distros than users.


Linux distros ~= a few hundred
Linux (desktop) users (according to Ballmer): slightly > Mac Osx users ~= 7% of desktop users ~= (rough estimate) 35 million users.

35 million >>> a few hundred.

QED.

Edited 2010-09-20 02:33 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 4

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

Why do the most ardent Linux supporters seem to lack a sense of humor?

Here, do yourself a favour and do some reading:
http://broadcast.oreilly.com/2010/09/debunking-the-1-myth.html

Already did:
http://www.binplay.com/2010/09/yes-linux-really-has-1.html


BTW: If you are having trouble deciding on a Linux distribution to use, just choose one upon which others base themselves. There are really only four choices: Debian, RedHat, OpenSuSe and Slackware.


Again with the condescending attitude. I already have a favorite distro, thanks. It's called Clonezilla.
http://clonezilla.org/

For future reference you should probably assume that anyone who posts at a website called OSNEWS has tried a few Linux distros.

The best choice for a Linux desktop at this time is

I don't think Linux is ready for the desktop. I think it needs to bake a few more years before being pushed on the public. It's fine for servers and cell phones but on the desktop it still has too many rough edges.

Edited 2010-09-20 06:39 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

"The best choice for a Linux desktop at this time is probably


I don't think Linux is ready for the desktop. I think it needs to bake a few more years before being pushed on the public. It's fine for servers and cell phones but on the desktop it still has too many rough edges.
"

Immaterial if you are trying to claim that Linux isn't ready for the desktop ... since about 7% of desktop users disagree with you.

So, for those who have not fallen for propoganda attempts at disparaging Linux, and who are aware of what contemproray Linux on the desktop can do and its realised quality, functionality, stability, performance, security and tremendous value-for-money, what is the best distribution?

That very much depends on what role you have in mind. People who are familiar with Linux already, and who have a definitive role in mind ... they do not need any such recommendation about which is the best Linux distribution for their purpose. They will already know.

So the question of "what is the best distribution?" for Linux on the desktop is typically asked by people who are new to Linux.

The assumption then would be that these people are after an easy-to-install Linux desktop that covers "typical" desktop usage patterns and which would be relatively easy to pick up for a person used to using Windows.

My suggestion, based on that assumption, would be for such people to try MEPIS or Kubuntu 10.04. If such a user were to install either of those, they would have a great experience, typically with no problems, and enjoy great software that did everything they wanted of it admirably well.

Mandriva would have been a reasonable suggestion also, but it appears to be running into some difficulty lately, as evidenced by this very thread topic, and so it is probably not such a good suggestion any longer.

Edited 2010-09-20 07:13 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

marafaka Member since:
2006-01-03

nt_jerkface: "I don't think Linux is ready for the desktop."

You are right, because Linux has no user interface. That's what distros are there for.

Reply Parent Score: 0

google_ninja Member since:
2006-02-05

re the 1% article, it was a great mix of common sense and downright stupidity.

He is right that the numbers don't add up. That's because that hitslink site is about what is actually being used, not what is sold or bought.

The over counting of windows is a new one to me, I would imagine windows dramatically under counted -- most corporate/governament networks are only visible to the outside world as a single IP addresses, and most corporate/governament networks are 100% MS.

Using sales numbers doesn't really mean anything. At my first job, I remember needing a few crappy machines for something. An IT guy brought me into a basement room filled with probably about 300 several years old NT4 machines. If you looked at sales stats, those all would have been considered windows machines. In this case, I have many friends who have netbooks, but they all installed either xp, windows 7, or osx on them. Hitslink would catch that, netbook sales numbers wont.

At the end of the day, the hitslink numbers should not be taken as gospel, but they are by far the most reliable actual usage numbers we can get.

Reply Parent Score: 3