Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 22nd Sep 2010 17:58 UTC
Apple As I was casually browsing around today, I came across this blog post. It's about the recently released VLC media player for the iPad, which you can use to play just about any video under the sun on your iPad. The blog post is a complaint about a bit of help text that's not properly rendered inside the application - annoying, but no dealbreaker. Until I actually read the text - this is how you're supposed to get content on your iPad?
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RE: yup
by kaiwai on Thu 23rd Sep 2010 02:44 UTC in reply to "yup"
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

I never liked how iTunes and other apple products work with it for media. I am a fan of the drag and drop and your done philosiphy. this is just apples way of ensuring it remains the central hub for your digital and media driven life. once they let go of that control its hard to reestablish that, BUT if they never let it go they reign supreme (steve jobs style thinking).

it allows apple to be at every stage of use in its product line. good for business, bad for consumers...
(hell for people like us!)


Drag and drop only works well if you have a small library of music and movies but as soon as you get into the gigabytes in size it becomes very cumbersome. For example I had a Cowon D2 player and used the drag and drop methodology - the problem was I had over 20GB of music and it would take ages each time it would reboot as it would re-index all the songs over and over again - same can be said for the Sandisk Sansa which had a similar flaw (made worse that the more music you had the more sluggish the interface was).

I would have preferred Apple to adopt something like MTP but I hardly see it as much of a barrier if one is going to be 'All Apple' which is pretty much where I sit - and there are viable alternatives to the iPod the question is whether you're willing to give up the coolness status associated with Apple.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: yup - drag and drop
by jabbotts on Thu 23rd Sep 2010 11:44 in reply to "RE: yup"
jabbotts Member since:
2007-09-06

The could easily provide a device that gives you drag and drop with the option to use a media manager application. The current problem is providing devices that only allow a media manager in absence of the drag/drop option.

With Amorak, I can mount the device and have the media manager dump content to the device directly. I can dump to a Portable directory and rsync/ssh it to the device (my current method since it allows update through any network connection). I can simply open the content library and drag or ssh files without touching the media manager. That's world better than being required to connect a wire and run Itunes or outright void the device warranty.

Consumers could have it both ways and choose what works best for there needs if the device manufacturers would stop playing BS walled garden games.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[3]: yup - drag and drop
by kaiwai on Fri 24th Sep 2010 01:01 in reply to "RE[2]: yup - drag and drop"
kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

The could easily provide a device that gives you drag and drop with the option to use a media manager application. The current problem is providing devices that only allow a media manager in absence of the drag/drop option.

With Amorak, I can mount the device and have the media manager dump content to the device directly. I can dump to a Portable directory and rsync/ssh it to the device (my current method since it allows update through any network connection). I can simply open the content library and drag or ssh files without touching the media manager. That's world better than being required to connect a wire and run Itunes or outright void the device warranty.

Consumers could have it both ways and choose what works best for there needs if the device manufacturers would stop playing BS walled garden games.


There was a standard, PTP for cameras and MTP for media devices - and as long as hardware vendors conformed to those specifications then everything was sweet. The problem was, however, many would have half baked implementations that caused problems for those who relied on libmtp for compatibility. The problem is compounded even further by Microsoft who themselves stopped using it in favour of creating a proprietary one for Zune (along with turning their back on PlaysForSure which enabled cross player compatibility).

I had a Creative hard disk MP3 player for many years and it worked perfectly with MTP; it worked beautifully with Windows Media Player, synchronisation was incredibly fast and reliable. I can't work out for the love of me why there is this movement back to proprietary protocols when for so many years the industry was trying to move to a single protocol with a single player on Windows.

Edited 2010-09-24 01:02 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3