Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 21st Sep 2010 21:32 UTC, submitted by diegocg
Qt After many months of designing, coding, reviewing, testing and documenting, Qt 4.7.0 is finally ready for the big time. Although it's a little more than nine months since Qt's last feature release (4.6.0 on December 1, 2009), the seeds of some of the new stuff in 4.7 were sown much earlier. Indeed, many of the ideas behind the biggest new feature in Qt 4.7.0, Qt Quick, were born more than two years ago, not long after Qt 4.4 was released
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siride
Member since:
2006-01-02

That's also true for COBOL and FORTRAN and MS Windows. Good company, eh? I mean, to be honest, that's really a terrible argument. Christianity as been around for a long time, as has prostitution and murder. Does age really mean anything? Not really. Just because C++ has been around does not mean it's the be-all, end-all.

Look, C++ is not a well-designed, well-implemented language. It's not good for RAD or business apps. It has its pluses, but mostly in the metaprogramming, performance-computing and research arena. For writing business apps, it just doesn't make sense. You have to do so much work, deal with slow and difficult compilers and work around semantics problems in the language. Why bother when you just need to make some forms and DB connections? Just use .NET or Java for that.

Reply Parent Score: 2

tbcpp Member since:
2006-02-06

True, but that does ignore one important fact: there's no true replacement for C++ available. If I'm writing a game/compiler/hpc code I am forced to use C++. I may not like it, but there is no other option for code that needs to run as fast as possible and with as little memory overhead as possible.

Get me a language that can do that (and with a decent ide) and I'll be a happy camper.

Reply Parent Score: 3

siride Member since:
2006-01-02

True, but that does ignore one important fact: there's no true replacement for C++ available. If I'm writing a game/compiler/hpc code I am forced to use C++. I may not like it, but there is no other option for code that needs to run as fast as possible and with as little memory overhead as possible.

Get me a language that can do that (and with a decent ide) and I'll be a happy camper.

It's like people don't even read my post. Yeah, I know that C++ is really good at some things. But for throwing together GUI apps, business apps, webapps, etc. it really is not useful (and those are the kind of apps we are talking about, after all, since the topic of conversation is Qt, not general C++ usage). It's better to use .NET or Java.

Interestingly enough, both of those languages are quite suitable for writing compilers and indeed the compilers for languages on those platforms are generally written in C# or Java. And guess what? They are much faster than C++ compilers. Memory usage is definitely worse, though, but with the exception of some embedded platforms, that's not an issue.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

True, but that does ignore one important fact: there's no true replacement for C++ available. If I'm writing a game/compiler/hpc code I am forced to use C++. I may not like it, but there is no other option for code that needs to run as fast as possible and with as little memory overhead as possible. Get me a language that can do that (and with a decent ide) and I'll be a happy camper.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D_%28programming_language%29

http://www.digitalmars.com/d/

If you don't need OO:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Google_go

Will either of those suit?

Reply Parent Score: 3

turrini Member since:
2006-10-31

I am C programmer for over 20 years and never had any of the problems you mentioned above.\

The difficults that novice programmers encounter are because they don't know computing at all.

That's why they makes mistakes.
That's why they can't develop in C/C++.

A real programmer must know, MUST KNOW, the machine he is operating.

Otherwise, they keep themselves in ignorance and use .NET, Java or SomeOtherManagedAndEasyLanguage.

Edited 2010-09-23 19:19 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 3

siride Member since:
2006-01-02

Read the C++ FQA. It's not just beginner mistakes. The language is fundamentally *nasty*.

I've also done C for quite some time. I've done assembly. I even wrote my own assembler and my own virtual machine. I've done C++, Java, Perl, PHP, C# and, sigh, even VBA. I have books on operating system kernels and how the computer works on a low-level. I've taken classes in that stuff. Believe me, I'm not just saying this because I don't get pointers. I get pointers. I can deal with C++, but it's such a fscking pain and the more I use other languages, the more I find them to be considerably superior except in the performance/memory-usage department. Better, though, is to write most of your app in a managed language and write the performance critical core in C++ or another unmanaged language.

Reply Parent Score: 3

nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26


That's why they makes mistakes.
That's why they can't develop in C/C++.


You should work on English before any programming language so you don't sound like Skwisgaar Skwigelf.


Otherwise, they keep themselves in ignorance and use .NET, Java or SomeOtherManagedAndEasyLanguage.


RealCarpentersDontUseNailGuns.

You seem to not realize that lot of C# programmers have a C++ background. A big reason why MS used C syntax was to make it appealing to programmers with existing C/C++ experience.

Sometimes it makes sense to use managed code, sometimes it doesn't. But being completely dismissive of managed languages doesn't make any sense at all.

Watch out for those pointers, don't want to leave yet another buffer overflow exploit.

Reply Parent Score: 2