Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 24th Sep 2010 23:20 UTC
Google A few days ago I dove into the lawsuit filed by Skyhook against Google, and came to the conclusion that Skyhook's case - while an entirely plausible sequence of events considering Google is a big company and hence prone to abuse - simply wasn't a very good one. Google's CEO Eric Schmidt has given a rather generic-looking statement on the matter, but however generic it may be, there's a hint in there.
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RE: It's deja vu all over again
by Morgan on Sat 25th Sep 2010 10:04 UTC in reply to "It's deja vu all over again"
Morgan
Member since:
2005-06-29

I would say Linux (Android), Apple and Symbian if you think globally, or Linux, Apple and RIM if you think Western Hemisphere. Windows Mobile 7 is just coming out the door, and doesn't seem to have much momentum at all. I just don't see it displacing the entrenched competition.

Then again, those words were said by many about Android just a couple of years ago. Of course, Android is still kind of new and fresh; We've had Windows Mobile for nearly 10 years (13 if you count the original WinCE) and it's never really taken off.

Reply Parent Score: 3

mckill Member since:
2007-06-12

he wasn't referring to current market share, he's referring to where we'll be in a few years. it's not that hard to see that Nokia and RIM are constantly losing market share in what phones are going to be (right now they're "smart phones").

Reply Parent Score: 2

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

I was speaking of the future too, but keep in mind the future is rooted in the present.

I don't see Nokia being hurt too badly in the global space, as they are the dominant player outside North America and for good reason; Symbian in my personal opinion barely qualifies as a "smartphone OS" but it is solid and versatile, and people just seem to love it. As for RIM, they have a strong foothold in the corporate and government worlds here in the US, though I've seen my own organization slowly making the switch to Android now that Nextel has embraced Android powered devices.

From what I've seen of WM7, it's just too little, too late. They've had over 10 years to "fix" WinMo and have failed at every opportunity. I may eat these words in a few years, but I'm going to go ahead and say that they will likely not even come close to competing with Google, Apple, Nokia and RIM for the foreseeable future.

Microsoft should concentrate more on their desktop OS and video game divisions; they really shine in those areas now. Windows 7 in particular is a great OS and deserves the greater part of their initiative.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

Linux (Android)
Meh. I would like people to stop saying Android is a linux platform: the kernel is, for all means and purpose, forked, so it is not part of the linux ecosystem anymore (no contribution from google to linux, or the opposite - that's even worse than a distro fork), neither is the userspace enclosed in the dalvik VM : no reuse of existing software and libraries, no improvement in software management.
MeeGo is a linux OS; Android is not even a fork, it's a spin-off.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Morgan Member since:
2005-06-29

Well at least I didn't call it GNU/Linux. ;)

I call it Linux because, while it's a fork, it's still got a LOT of linux code in it, as well as the open source spirit. To put it another way, Mac OS X is a fork of FreeBSD with a Mach kernel but it's still considered UNIX.

I understand your ire, but until Google strips out so much code from the kernel that it becomes their own creation, I'll consider it in the family of Linux-based operating systems.

Besides, it gets the Linux name into the public awareness and that's a good thing.

Reply Parent Score: 3

tony Member since:
2005-07-06

"Linux (Android)
Meh. I would like people to stop saying Android is a linux platform: the kernel is, for all means and purpose, forked, so it is not part of the linux ecosystem anymore (no contribution from google to linux, or the opposite - that's even worse than a distro fork), neither is the userspace enclosed in the dalvik VM : no reuse of existing software and libraries, no improvement in software management.
MeeGo is a linux OS; Android is not even a fork, it's a spin-off.
"

This is a common Nokia fanboy talking point, but it's one I don't get. How is Android "not Linux", and how does any of the reasons you state make it not Linux, and why does it even matter? I mean, there are valid points Nokia fanboys have, but this isn't among them.

To a regular phone user, who cares if it's forked, or if there's a VM. That's all in the background, stuff they don't care about.

And so what if Android is "forked". Isn't that what Linux is for? A framework that you can use and customize to your specific needs? They're abiding by the GPL, by the letter and the spirit of open source, and how is it any different than Meego or Maemo (which one are they using again?). They'll all based on Linux, modifying it as they need. That's what Linux is for. The Nokia fanboy argument isn't even semantic, it's contrived pedantic.

Reply Parent Score: 2

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I would say Linux (Android), Apple and Symbian if you think globally, or Linux, Apple and RIM if you think Western Hemisphere. Windows Mobile 7 is just coming out the door, and doesn't seem to have much momentum at all. I just don't see it displacing the entrenched competition.

Then again, those words were said by many about Android just a couple of years ago. Of course, Android is still kind of new and fresh; We've had Windows Mobile for nearly 10 years (13 if you count the original WinCE) and it's never really taken off.


Windows Phone 7 is an entirely different beast to previous releases so the comparison aren't even comparing Apples with Apples. You note about momentum - how do you define that? Microsoft's focus is on quality third party applications and not merely quantity. I can tell you that the AppStore may boast raw numbers but the share amount of worthless crap out number the amount of good software that is available.

Windows Phone 7 is providing an entirely new foundation for future development that fits their larger enterprise direction. Rather than the disjointed clusterfuck that existed before - you're going to have Silverlight applications that can scale from the desktop down to the handheld. The ability to develop one application and deploy it throughout your company without needing to tweak it for each platform it sits on. It is a much needed step in the right direction when compared to the old way of doing things.

Do I think Microsoft is worried about the competition? sure but their primary focus I would say right now with Windows Phone 7 is firstly on the enterprise market with their complete ecosystem with probably more consumer focused devices being released with maybe Windows Phone 7.1.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Radio Member since:
2009-06-20

Momentum could be defined by the answer to "dear developers, which platform do you intend to develop for in the close future?". So far, it is true that iOS grabed the lion's share.
http://www.appcelerator.com/mobile-developer-survey-june-2010/
http://www.macworld.com/article/150690/2010/04/mobile_app_developme...
Mobile Developer Surveys only register what is the latest fad, but given that mobile app development doesn't take too long, that translates to new, trendy apps.

Of course, that can shift very quickly (especially with the saturation in the app stores of the leading platforms).

Reply Parent Score: 1