Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 29th Sep 2010 22:14 UTC, submitted by Amix
Morphos Bright days ahead for the Amiga world. AROS is doing well, AmigaOS4 is getting one heck of a machine in the AmigaOne X1000, and MorphOS continues its development at a brisk pace. Version 2.6 of MorphOS, currently in development, will add support for (G4, I'm assuming) PowerMacs, which, alongside support for the Mac Mini and eMac, gives MorphOS a solid base of used hardware to run on.
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Drumhellar
Member since:
2005-07-12

A 400 MHz G4 Mac is going to boot quicker with MorphOS than a brand new top-end Mac.


I've never understood the obsession with boot times. Granted, excessive boot times are a pain, but I only boot my computer once in a while. Usually, my system goes into standby when I'm away, and it comes out really quickly.

Reply Parent Score: 3

spiderman Member since:
2008-10-23

You should switch it off when you are away. It is burning power even in standby mode.

Reply Parent Score: 4

Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

It's burning power when booting. Lots of hard disk activity, fans at full speed, lots of CD drive access, all while I'm spending my time waiting for a desktop to appear.

Fast boot times lessens this, but low power states use a a small amount of power.

I wonder what the power difference is, between 3 minutes of boot/shutdown activity (total) versus an hour of standby?

Reply Parent Score: 3

Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

I've never understood the obsession with boot times. Granted, excessive boot times are a pain, but I only boot my computer once in a while. Usually, my system goes into standby when I'm away, and it comes out really quickly.

Short boot times are interesting because cold boot is better than standby for a few reasons :
-No power wasted, except that of the power light. Contrast with keeping RAM (especially) and some other circuitry running for nothing. This issue is voided by hibernation, though, but then boot times become important again.
-Software performance degrades with uptime. There's always a memory leak somewhere, some applications leave processes in the background wasting CPU time for unknown purposes even after they're closed, some crashes have long-term consequences... Fetching a fresh OS image from the disk allows one to go back in a clean state where software runs at full speed and maximum reliability.

Reply Parent Score: 3

Drumhellar Member since:
2005-07-12

This issue is voided by hibernation, though, but then boot times become important again.


With hibernation, boot times is scarcely more than loading a ram image off the hard disk. That's fine for 2GB of ram. I wonder how practical it is for 16GB?

oftware performance degrades with uptime. There's always a memory leak somewhere, some applications leave processes in the background wasting CPU time for unknown purposes even after they're closed, some crashes have long-term consequences... Fetching a fresh OS image from the disk allows one to go back in a clean state where software runs at full speed and maximum reliability.


I have to disagree with this statment. This isn't the days of Windows 98. My system doesn't degrade as uptime increases, and Windows does a fine damn job of shutting down processes. Also, the software I use is well written, and doesn't normally doesn't leak memory. If it does, I restart only the app in question, and sanity is returned.

Reply Parent Score: 2