Linked by Kroc Camen on Wed 6th Oct 2010 16:37 UTC
Editorial In response to Jean-Louis Glassee's article "The OS Doesn't Matter..." I wrote quite simply: the future of the browser wars is he who integrates with the OS best. This phrase came from my article lambasting Microsoft's use of HTML for their IE9 jump lists, which caused quite a stir. In the wave of ever increasing web browser capability, the operating system is going to matter to web users more than it ever has before.
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RE: Windows is not the only one
by Kroc on Wed 6th Oct 2010 17:52 UTC in reply to "Windows is not the only one"
Kroc
Member since:
2005-11-10

The mention of hardware acceleration is simply that Microsoft are making best use of Windows API, without that necessitating IE-only websites—a good thing.

Mozilla I think are going to face some real challenges in the near future. They haven’t understood native behaviour as well as the other browsers. Safari and Camino behave *far* more natively on the Mac, and this does matter in the small details. Just simple things like using the system-wide dictionary, auto-correct and system services.

The more a browser can behave native to the operating system, the more this is going to matter as HTML starts to touch the hardware.

Reply Parent Score: 5

ssokolow Member since:
2010-01-21

Agreed... though I'll be curious to see what ends up happening with notifications on Linux. Firefox 3.6 still hasn't merged the patch Ubuntu uses to send its notifications via libnotify and I'm not sure about Firefox 4.

Perhaps more interesting, when they implemented the notifications for web apps, Google specifically justified implementing their own notification system with "OS-native mechanisms like libnotify aren't powerful enough." ...which I can understand as a developer (especially given Ubuntu's efforts to design a more crippled notification daemon), but I'm not sure I can excuse as an end user.

Reply Parent Score: 1

theosib Member since:
2006-03-02

Well, even Camino isn't completely native. It integrates fairly well, but it too suffers from the long-standing firefox bug that prevents a Mac from going to sleep if you leave it idle. This is why I stick to Safari, because it doesn't have this problem. With Safari, I can set my MacBook Pro down and forget about it, and it'll go to sleep automatically. With Firefox and Camino, it'll run the battery down. (And I have one of the 2007-2008 MPBs that ruins batteries, so mine just suddenly powers off at some random point when it gets below 20%, and I lose work.)

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

The mention of hardware acceleration is simply that Microsoft are making best use of Windows API, without that necessitating IE-only websites—a good thing. Mozilla I think are going to face some real challenges in the near future. They haven’t understood native behaviour as well as the other browsers. Safari and Camino behave *far* more natively on the Mac, and this does matter in the small details. Just simple things like using the system-wide dictionary, auto-correct and system services. The more a browser can behave native to the operating system, the more this is going to matter as HTML starts to touch the hardware.


I didn't get your point at first. Firefox 4.0 has just as good hardware acceleration as IE9, (when it include Jaegermonkey) at least as good Javascript if not faster,

http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/beta/technology/#feature-perfo...

slightly better standards compliance and better support for emerging standards such as CSS3, and equivalent features such as Panorama and Apps Tab.

http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/beta/features/#feature-apps-ta...

But Firefox has all kinds of extra features as well

It has WebGL and Animated PNGs as graphics features:
http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/beta/technology/#feature-graph...

It has geolocation, Orientation and Multitouch support
http://www.mozilla.com/en-US/firefox/beta/technology/#feature-devic...

In addition it has behind-the-scenes features such as web worker threads. As always, Firefox will still have XUL, giving it the largest extensions library of any browser.

Personally, I am of the view that other browsers on any OS will have trouble matching the features and performance of Firefox 4.0.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Kroc Member since:
2005-11-10

But at the same time Mozilla are really struggling to make a good web browser on mobile devices because it doesn’t ‘fit’. They practically don’t exist in that market. N900, and that’s it. The Android port thus far has been horribly slow and clunky. OS fit and finish matters here, where before XUL could get away with lacking polish.

Reply Parent Score: 1