Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 15th Oct 2010 20:54 UTC
Apple Is it an indication of Steve Jobs' (in)famous strive for perfection, or just stupid bone-headedness? The white variant of the iPhone 4 was first delayed for a few weeks, but those few weeks became 'end of the year'. Now we know why: the manufacturers Apple employs are apparently having issues matching the shades of white of the various components. This anecdote ties in nicely with a very interesting interview with John Sculley about Steve Jobs' ways of doing business.
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RE[5]: Hmmm
by MysterMask on Sun 17th Oct 2010 18:40 UTC in reply to "RE[4]: Hmmm"
MysterMask
Member since:
2005-07-12


"
target disk mode

What's that ?
"

See? That's what I'm talking about. You may think that HW is just standardized interchangeable pieces with no engineering any more. But it's how this HW is used to the benefit of the user!
(Target disk mode means you can boot any Mac in a 'disk mode' where it behaves like an external drive to other macs. Very useful in various circumstances e. g. when moving to new HW or in support situations)

On a mature market like the laptop one, the configuration is now more or less standard


And you are satisfied with the given? Engineering is not about selling the same piece of HW 1'000'000 times. It's about pushing further. With the "it's standard" attitude we would have been stuck with CP/M and 8bit CPUs.

I really like vendors that are able to disrupt the 'standards' market with new innovations - that do real HW engineering and not only throw together the cheapest 'standards' parts. That try to improve customer experience and not just brag with useless spec lists.

Cam is more or less a standard features of laptops now.


And why has it become a standard feature? (see my point now)

Not sure what you're complaining about : speakers or minijack output?
[..]
But if I want a computer just for work, do I need top-notch sound quality just to annoy my coworkers?


I talk about minijack output with heavy static crackles (I wanted the sound for not being distracted by co-workers talk. It doesn't have to be top-notch, only usable. And why use an iPod if the box under the desk seems to have all necessary parts for that - but alas ..)

My point was: Selling a PC with a sound card that is not usable shows that even though things seem to be standardized, there are still differences between manufacturers. I'd rather buy a piece of HW from a company that does care about the fitness of the final product and not about specs lists.

Choosing a computer is only a matter of knowing what kind of keyboard you want, if sound quality matters to you, if you want bluetooth...


Your horizon is too narrow for my taste.

Edited 2010-10-17 18:43 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[6]: Hmmm
by Neolander on Sun 17th Oct 2010 20:37 in reply to "RE[5]: Hmmm"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

(Target disk mode means you can boot any Mac in a 'disk mode' where it behaves like an external drive to other macs. Very useful in various circumstances e. g. when moving to new HW or in support situations)

That's just a crappy Mac workaround to replace an ability PC users have had for ages : take the HDD out of the computer with no skills and only a screw driver.

And you are satisfied with the given? Engineering is not about selling the same piece of HW 1'000'000 times. It's about pushing further. With the "it's standard" attitude we would have been stuck with CP/M and 8bit CPUs.

Yeah, I'm satisfied with the current PC market as far as hardware is concerned. Good enough for me, except for the weight/hardness (I'd love to see a computer as light and flexible as a sheet of paper) and those horrible LCD screens that just need to die and be replaced by OLED as quickly as possible.

My main gripes with computers nowadays are in software. Same for most people. There's a lot to fix in there.

I really like vendors that are able to disrupt the 'standards' market with new innovations - that do real HW engineering and not only throw together the cheapest 'standards' parts. That try to improve customer experience and not just brag with useless spec lists.

I think it's that line of thinking that led that engineering failure that shiny LCD screens are to become so widespread. The will to make something new.

And why has it become a standard feature? (see my point now)

I wish it hadn't. I dislike it when I have to buy things I don't need together with things I need.

Edited 2010-10-17 20:40 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[7]: Hmmm
by Thom_Holwerda on Sun 17th Oct 2010 22:51 in reply to "RE[6]: Hmmm"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

That's just a crappy Mac workaround to replace an ability PC users have had for ages : take the HDD out of the computer with no skills and only a screw driver.


Win.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[7]: Hmmm
by r_a_trip on Mon 18th Oct 2010 11:53 in reply to "RE[6]: Hmmm"
r_a_trip Member since:
2005-07-06

That's just a crappy Mac workaround to replace an ability PC users have had for ages : take the HDD out of the computer with no skills and only a screw driver.

Sorry to butt in, but taking out the harddrive to troubleshoot? We Linux users have had the ability to boot a Live-CD on the affected machine for years and do what we need to do on the drive in place and copy stuff to an external USB drive if necessary.

Work around or not, the ability to mount a Mac as an external drive on another Mac sounds nifty. It sure beats disassembling the machine to get at the disk/data. Pulling apart a machine should be a last resort, not par of the course.

Reply Parent Score: 2