Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 19th Oct 2010 12:23 UTC
Talk, Rumors, X Versus Y Catfight! Get out your mobile phones and start filming, because two important personalities in the mobile world just got into a catfight. After the presentation of Apple's (once again) stellar quarterly results (what's with the low iPad sales, though?), Apple's CEO Steve Jobs went on a bit of a tangent regarding Android (among other things). Google's Andy Rubin, the father of Android, responded in a pretty fun way via Twitter.
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RE: Jobs' attitude reaks of fear
by kaiwai on Tue 19th Oct 2010 14:16 UTC in reply to "Jobs' attitude reaks of fear"
kaiwai
Member since:
2005-07-06

They fear that Android will erode their market share and lower their benefits.

It has come to a point where Apple can't ignore and dismiss Android anymore as something irrelevant/harmless.

So Jobs is trying to belittle his concurent / to make people think that Apple is still the dominant player / has the upper hands / more market share when in fact Apple has already lost and is loosing more ground as time pass.

The headstart that Apple Had by being first in the market is gone, they are now going to play catch up and market their product as better integrated...and slowly get for smartphones the 5~10% (maybee 20%)niche that they have for desktop computers.

They are very successfull, but now they have to fight against Microsoft on the desktop front, with Nokia, Rim, HTC, Motorola, Microsoft on the smartphone front, with Dell, HP, Microsoft, Acer, Asus, etc... on the tablet front and with google on the tv front.

It's going to be an uphill battle for Apple now as their opponents now have a worthy and proven software stack to rely upon...They'll still thrive with their establish fan base but growth will become harder.

Good luck !


All that may be true but it doesn't take away from what he said during the earnings call - there is a price to pay for the kind of openness that comes with having a free for all. There is a reason why Microsoft has upped the requirements when it comes to WP7 phones - they don't want another debacle of half baked phones coming to market with their flag ship product being screwed up because some jackass at some OEM wishes to customise it to buggery.

As for Android, the fact that HTC has told customers of phones less than a year old to 'go fuck themselves' (HTC Hero being one example) after refusing to provide Android 2.2 upgrades tells me that I'd sooner have an iPhone or a WP7 Phone than dealing with the crap that Android users have to put up with. Owning a device for less than a year then the OEM/Handset maker (don't even fucking mention the carrier, they have nothing to do with it) decides not to provide an upgrade to Android 2.2. The Android world is turning into a giant fragmented clusterfuck but too many people here are hating Apple because it is the 'cool thing to do' - the same twerps used to hate Microsoft, and before that they used to hate some other boogyman.

Reply Parent Score: 5

molnarcs Member since:
2005-09-10

FYI:
http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2010-07/30/froyo-yo-hero

Check the date of the article too - not too long after the OTA update of Froyo. The article concludes that putting Froyo on the Hero makes it "pretty much perfect". Estimated time to install ... about 15 minutes (not including download times of course).

Now I certainly concede the point that manufacturers should support their devices longer (although the warranty itself is only 1 year). Of course I would be happier if HTC itself released updates for their old phones, but the very least they let users update. This also neatly supports Rubin's retort - yes, that's openness, when random devs can download the source code and modify it to run on pretty much anything.

Reply Parent Score: 3

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

FYI:
http://www.wired.co.uk/news/archive/2010-07/30/froyo-yo-hero

Check the date of the article too - not too long after the OTA update of Froyo. The article concludes that putting Froyo on the Hero makes it "pretty much perfect". Estimated time to install ... about 15 minutes (not including download times of course).

Now I certainly concede the point that manufacturers should support their devices longer (although the warranty itself is only 1 year). Of course I would be happier if HTC itself released updates for their old phones, but the very least they let users update. This also neatly supports Rubin's retort - yes, that's openness, when random devs can download the source code and modify it to run on pretty much anything.


All I can say about the 1 year warranty and Android availability - iPhone 3G was released July 2008, over 2 years ago and yet one is able to run iOS 4.1 on it. If Apple can provide software updates to a device over 2 years old then I think HTC can do the same.

Reply Parent Score: 2

meridianrebel Member since:
2010-08-30

I have a HTC Hero and have spoken with HTC about the lack of an "official" Froyo release for it. In order to get an official Froyo release, it must be requested (a.k.a. "paid for") by the carrier. It's frustrating, to say the least. However, I've been running CyanogenMod on mine and am very happy with Froyo on my HTC Hero. Runs much faster than the stock HTC Sense 2.1 garbage that came on it - not to mention, being able to control my processor speed (underclock when not in use, overclock when in use) has made my battery last 300% longer than it did with the stock HTC Sense bastardization of Android on it. All in all, that's one of the strengths of using an Android phone - being able to do exactly what I did. ;)

Reply Parent Score: 1

kaiwai Member since:
2005-07-06

I have a HTC Hero and have spoken with HTC about the lack of an "official" Froyo release for it. In order to get an official Froyo release, it must be requested (a.k.a. "paid for") by the carrier. It's frustrating, to say the least. However, I've been running CyanogenMod on mine and am very happy with Froyo on my HTC Hero. Runs much faster than the stock HTC Sense 2.1 garbage that came on it - not to mention, being able to control my processor speed (underclock when not in use, overclock when in use) has made my battery last 300% longer than it did with the stock HTC Sense bastardization of Android on it. All in all, that's one of the strengths of using an Android phone - being able to do exactly what I did. ;)


Nothing has ever stopped HTC from providing the updates directly to the customer - download an self extracting firmware update and provide it over a USB port. If Telecom NZ/ZTE can provide firmware updates via their website I think that HTC can provide an Android download off their own website for individuals to install onto their phones. To rely on unverified third party ROMs in lieu of real support by the hand set vendor tells me more about the lack of any real customer support by those said companies than any real commitment to providing the sort of support which even Apple is willing to provide to devices over 2 years old (iPhone 3G was released in July 2008 and yet still receiving iOS updates).

Reply Parent Score: 3