Linked by Thom Holwerda on Wed 20th Oct 2010 19:02 UTC
Apple So, Apple held its usual autumn press get-together just now, and after a few rather uninspiring ones (to me, at least), they finally managed to blow me away, with the new MacBook Air (especially the 11.6" variant). They also gave a sneak peek at Mac OS X 10.7 Lion, which has... An App Store. An App Store Apple is going to open on Snow Leopard within 90 days.
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10.7, not 10.8
by henrikmk on Wed 20th Oct 2010 19:08 UTC
henrikmk
Member since:
2005-07-10

MacOSX Lion is version 10.7, not 10.8.

Reserve the "...yet" thought for 10.8. :-)

Reply Score: 2

RE: 10.7, not 10.8
by Thom_Holwerda on Wed 20th Oct 2010 19:10 in reply to "10.7, not 10.8"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

D'oh. Fixed.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE: 10.7, not 10.8
by henderson101 on Wed 20th Oct 2010 22:16 in reply to "10.7, not 10.8"
henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

MacOSX Lion is version 10.7, not 10.8.

Reserve the "...yet" thought for 10.8. :-)


Is it? Where does Apple actually state the version number? They only spoke of "Lion" and "next version of OS ".... Take a look at the Product page = no mention of version number at all.

Reply Parent Score: 0

henderson101 Member since:
2006-05-30

Were does Apple give the version number? All they said was the OS is going to be the next version of OS X and that it will be named "Lion". You have made a giant leap to 10.7 there. I don't doubt it will be 10.7, but that version number was NOT released at the keynote yesterday and is NOT on the product page.

Reply Parent Score: 1

Eddyspeeder Member since:
2006-05-10

Steve Jobs listed the different felidae (cats) ascribed to the different versions; these amounted up to 7, with "Lion" being number 8 (note that the version number is NOT 10.8, because there first was an OSX 10.0)

This is already plenty of reason to assume that in the logical line of using felidae as names for the OSX series, it will be the follow-up to 10.6 and not the first one in a new series (i.e., 11.0).

Another reason to assume this one will be 10.7 is because of the way Apple treats its life cycles: they alternate releases between features and functionality. Snow Leopard was really aimed at consolidating the system's backbone, without many noticeable changes to the users. It was to be expected that Lion would be focused on adding new features.

Thirdly, and this should be obvious enough: the amount of "major changes" is not sufficient to say the next release is fit for being the first one of a brand new series; it isn't very different from Snow Leopard in look and feel. Personally I believe the Mac OS 11 series will be all-Cocoa, 64-bit-only, SSD-only, and ZFS-based, and I deem Apple keen enough to already have a team working on that for quite some time now.

In summary: there is no need to assume they will call it anything other than 10.7 and you can derive that from every aspect of the version's place in the system's life cycle.

Reply Parent Score: 3