Linked by David Adams on Fri 22nd Oct 2010 16:36 UTC, submitted by Amy Bennett
Windows As of today, Microsoft won't allow manufacturers to install XP on new netbooks," says blogger Kevin Fogarty. "That doesn't mean corporate customers who special-order hardware with XP won't be able to get it, or even that its market share ( 60 percent!) will drop any time soon.... It just means XP has taken the first babystep toward obsolescence and the long (really long, considering its market share) slide down toward the pit of minor operating systems like the MacOS X (4.39 percent) , Java ME (.95 percent) and "Other" (which I think is an alternative spelling for "Linux" (.85 percent).
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RE: Maybe an overdue step
by BluenoseJake on Fri 22nd Oct 2010 17:59 UTC in reply to "Maybe an overdue step"
BluenoseJake
Member since:
2005-08-11

Windows 7 runs pretty good on netbooks, and they are just going to get more powerful as time goes on, and will run 7 even more capably. We've already seen this with the debut of the dual core atom.

Linux had a chance in this market, but MS crushed it by keeping XP alive. That allowed them to get past Vista and build something capable of running on a netbook.

Reply Parent Score: 5

RE[2]: Maybe an overdue step
by darknexus on Fri 22nd Oct 2010 18:14 in reply to "RE: Maybe an overdue step"
darknexus Member since:
2008-07-15

Keeping XP alive wasn't the clincher imho, it was the god awful Linux installations chosen by the major netbook OEMs. They were either horrifically out of date (Acer/Linpus), or completely broken (Asus/Xandros). What customers got as a result was a broken device that wouldn't do what they wanted it to do. That's what killed Linux. Dell's Ubuntu option was just too little, too late and it didn't help that Dell used the seriously out of date by then 8.04 LTS release that didn't even have Firefox 3. Linux might have worked if the OEMs hadn't turned it into a fiasco.

Reply Parent Score: 5

BlueofRainbow Member since:
2009-01-06

Aiming at the total user experience with quasi-dictatorial control of the final hardware and software appear to be what makes Apple successful in introducing its new devices. The X86 based OEMs have been forced to focus on only the hardware aspect of their devices as the software was handled by Microsoft. Applying the same development model with a minor adaption of a Linux distribution to the device ended-up with the bad results you mentioned.

A few comments about ARM based netbooks (and netpads) have been made.

What I am hoping, as an user, is for a major manufacturer to develop a device based on this platform plus a cleaned-up and modernized Risc OS (please keep the OS in ROMs for warp-speed boot!) and web-related apps along with some sound and video manipulation capabilities.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[3]: Maybe an overdue step
by jbauer on Sun 24th Oct 2010 09:13 in reply to "RE[2]: Maybe an overdue step"
jbauer Member since:
2005-07-06

Keeping XP alive wasn't the clincher imho, it was the god awful Linux installations chosen by the major netbook OEMs. They were either horrifically out of date (Acer/Linpus), or completely broken (Asus/Xandros). What customers got as a result was a broken device that wouldn't do what they wanted it to do. That's what killed Linux. Dell's Ubuntu option was just too little, too late and it didn't help that Dell used the seriously out of date by then 8.04 LTS release that didn't even have Firefox 3. Linux might have worked if the OEMs hadn't turned it into a fiasco.



Oh my, a two-year-old OS. What were they thinking? That can't possibly be useful!

Perhaps when the Linux world stops living in la-la-land and finally figures out that it's insane that you can't upgrade your damn browser unless you also upgrade the whole OS, then Linux might enjoy a bit of success.

As long as the current attitude prevails and there's always someone else to blame, it's just going nowhere.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Maybe an overdue step
by Hans Otten on Fri 22nd Oct 2010 18:16 in reply to "RE: Maybe an overdue step"
Hans Otten Member since:
2009-12-24

Windows XP feels outdated indeed, once you have Windows 7 on other systems. My netbook (Acer Aspire One D250, which has the two core Atom N270 and 2 GB memory) runs fine. XP was fine too, but W7 is much more usable. Admitted, not as speedy as larger systems and with a limited display resolution, but I do not experience W7 to be slower than XP.

And I do not have any problem with older software once you know how to work around the bad habits of ancient software wanting write access to Program files for example, or install it as XP SP2 or SP3 software. Even some older drivers like DLPORTIO (I need that for parallel port I/O software) can be installed on the 32 bit version of Windows 7.

Windows 7 64 bit, with the exception of 32 bit drivers of course, has very little problems running 32 bit software. Windows 7 seems to run most older software I encounter. And it looks like that took a lot of effort by Microsoft, to fit the better security and features around misbehaving software. Preserving your investments is something Microsoft values.

I do not really like the license model. Hopelessly complicated with too many choice, from the crippled Starter, Home Premium, Professional to Ultimate (and Enterprise for volume licensing custumer.

Edited 2010-10-22 18:25 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Maybe an overdue step
by lemur2 on Sat 23rd Oct 2010 02:02 in reply to "RE: Maybe an overdue step"
lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Windows 7 runs pretty good on netbooks, and they are just going to get more powerful as time goes on, and will run 7 even more capably. We've already seen this with the debut of the dual core atom.

Linux had a chance in this market, but MS crushed it by keeping XP alive. That allowed them to get past Vista and build something capable of running on a netbook.


World-wide, Linux has 33% of netbook market share.

Just because you are not allowed to buy netbook Linux in your local market at consumer outlet stores does not mean that it does not have a market.

Edited 2010-10-23 02:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2