Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 22nd Oct 2010 18:18 UTC
Windows There's been a bunch of Windows Phone 7 reviews out there, and most of them come to the same conclusion: great piece of software for a 1.0 release, but it does miss a few vital features. The Ars Technica review, as usual very in-depth, highlights one particular aspect of the platform that speaks to me: Windows Phone 7 has a sense of humour.
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RE[3]: .
by Neolander on Sun 24th Oct 2010 06:41 UTC in reply to "RE[2]: ."
Neolander
Member since:
2010-03-08

No, there's compulsory hardware buttons like the back button and the 'start' button. The problem with hw keyboards is the OS/apps have inconsistent support for landscape mode. That's why the 7 phones mostly have Pre-style bottom keyboards.

And what's the problem with that exactly ?

The precise reason why I hate those wide screens they put on laptops now is that most of my everyday tasks require screens to be tall rather than wide. Everything which involves some form of list and large amounts of text, in fact.

For text, the reason is obvious : the wider the screen, the bigger the eye strain, so I end up always wasting up space on the sides of my screen, either because I resize windows to reduce their width or because some nice web developer did the job for me by putting a maximal width in his CSSs.

For lists, one has to make a distinction between usual, uni-dimensional lists, and bi-dimensional lists (or "grids"). For grids, it's the same eyestrain problem as with text. For usual lists, it's just a matter of wasting space : since list items have a well-defined height, you can only read x list items before scrolling, where x is dependent on the height (and not the width) of the screen.

Apple did not make the core of iOS portrait mode-friendly just for the fun of annoying landscape fans, it's just that portrait is the most useful screen layout in most cases.

Landscape mode is good for videos and games, granted, but in those areas it's available on WP7 afaik.

Edited 2010-10-24 06:58 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[4]: .
by Icaria on Sun 24th Oct 2010 07:41 in reply to "RE[3]: ."
Icaria Member since:
2010-06-19

So let me see if I've got this straight.

1. Portrait is good for some uses.
2. Landscape is good for some uses.
3. Based upon premises 1 and 2, it's therefore okay for 7 Phone to provide second-rate landscape support?

As for your wide screen laptop, if you feel compelled to maximise every window, there's really nothing left to say.

Although I agree with you about multi-column lists. I really wish more apps supported a layout like the ls command, where you read down each column alphabetically, rather than zig-zagging across. I keep my thunar windows no more than 240 pixels wide to avoid the brain strain. Unfortunately, the Control Panel explorer window resizes itself the moment you enter on of it's configuration dialogues (or at least the ones that open in the same explorer window) and it provides no 'details' view mode, like normal explorer windows.

Reply Parent Score: 1

RE[5]: .
by Neolander on Sun 24th Oct 2010 08:00 in reply to "RE[4]: ."
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

So let me see if I've got this straight.

1. Portrait is good for some uses.
2. Landscape is good for some uses.
3. Based upon premises 1 and 2, it's therefore okay for 7 Phone to provide second-rate landscape support?

Not quite...

1. Portrait is good for most uses.
2. Landscape is good for some uses.
3. Based upon premises 1 and 2, it's therefore okay for 7 Phone to provide second-rate landscape support, since an UI should always optimize the common case (my assumption being that you fundamentally can't make an UI good at both portrait and landscape modes, that at some point in designing the UI you have to favor either portrait or landscape mode in order to go further, or to introduce inconsistent behaviors depending if the phone is in one mode or the other)

As for your wide screen laptop, if you feel compelled to maximise every window, there's really nothing left to say.

The problem is not that, but rather that at equal diagonal size and encumbrance, a wide screen provides less height.

(By the way, Windows really should provide a way to vertically maximize windows, like Metacity and KWin have been doing for some time now.)

Edited 2010-10-24 08:07 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2