Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 26th Oct 2010 20:36 UTC, submitted by tyrione
Linux Clang can build a kernel now. "The kernel can successfully boot to runlevel 5 (aka X + networking) on the Macbook, both on bare metal and in Qemu. The kernel can successfully boot to runlevel 3 on a secondary test machine, a microATX desktop box (Intel Atom). I haven't tried to start X on this box yet. The kernel can self-host; I am currently running a 'fourth generation' self-hosted Linux kernel built by a 'fourth generation' Clang."
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Simply: Congratulations
by pica on Wed 27th Oct 2010 08:11 UTC
pica
Member since:
2005-07-10

IMHO that's a major milestone. The next step would be a few distributors to switch to clang. This would make gcc and clang compete. Competition is IMHO vital for improvement.

Even if I have used neither clang nor llvm yet. But I have read about it, its concepts, its rationale. In my opinion the rationale behind llvm is sound, very sound.

Waiting for a project, in which I can use it ;-)

pica

Reply Score: 1

RE: Simply: Congratulations
by fithisux on Wed 27th Oct 2010 08:24 in reply to "Simply: Congratulations"
fithisux Member since:
2006-01-22

IMHO that's a major milestone. The next step would be a few distributors to switch to clang. This would make gcc and clang compete. Competition is IMHO vital for improvement.

Even if I have used neither clang nor llvm yet. But I have read about it, its concepts, its rationale. In my opinion the rationale behind llvm is sound, very sound.

Waiting for a project, in which I can use it ;-)

pica


I agree with you. I wish openwatcom and open64 were at the same level. More competition is much better. But anyway, I would also like a distro based on llvm.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Simply: Congratulations
by Neolander on Wed 27th Oct 2010 08:59 in reply to "Simply: Congratulations"
Neolander Member since:
2010-03-08

IMHO that's a major milestone. The next step would be a few distributors to switch to clang.

How about most major BSDs (including OSX) switching to it ?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Simply: Congratulations
by fithisux on Wed 27th Oct 2010 09:25 in reply to "RE: Simply: Congratulations"
fithisux Member since:
2006-01-22

"IMHO that's a major milestone. The next step would be a few distributors to switch to clang.

How about most major BSDs (including OSX) switching to it ?
"

How about resurrect PureDarwin and build it and debug (lldb) it with llvm/clang.

Reply Parent Score: 2

Also good news to me
by pica on Wed 27th Oct 2010 09:29 in reply to "RE: Simply: Congratulations"
pica Member since:
2005-07-10

But Linux is more popular -- I do neither write nor mean better -- than *BSD or Darwin.

pica

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: Simply: Congratulations
by phoenix on Wed 27th Oct 2010 23:36 in reply to "RE: Simply: Congratulations"
phoenix Member since:
2005-07-11

clang and llvm have been imported into the FreeBSD source tree, and it will be available as part of FreeBSD 9.0. It can build the entire FreeBSD OS (kernel, libs, boot loader, userland, toolchain), and can rebuild it all using the resulting system (ie, self-hosting). You can even build/run a FreeBSD system without GCC installed at all.

It's not currently possible to replace GCC for building apps via the ports tree. There are quite a few apps that fail if CC != cc (gcc). But, as these are reported, fixes are sent upstream, and (hopefully) things get better in the long-run. For those that don't build with clang, a version of GCC can be automatically installed via the ports tree, and that can be used to build the app.

Long-term, it's very likely that GCC will disappear from the FreeBSD base install and source tree.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: Simply: Congratulations
by Valhalla on Wed 27th Oct 2010 12:43 in reply to "Simply: Congratulations"
Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

IMHO that's a major milestone. The next step would be a few distributors to switch to clang. This would make gcc and clang compete. Competition is IMHO vital for improvement.

I agree, as long as it means that both compilers are supported. I don't want to be trapped in some ideologic choice of compiler, I want to be able to use the best compiler for my particular needs, which can differ from project to project aswell as different project stages. Clang IS aimed to be a drop-in replacement for GCC, so when it's compability matures we will be able to choose which compiler to use based upon what they offer technically, not because one is licenced under X and someone made a decision based upon ideology regarding which one to support, or because one compiler fails to compile certain code due to incompability.

Reply Parent Score: 1