Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 25th Oct 2010 19:00 UTC, submitted by sjvn
Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Xubuntu Well, this is sure to raise a few eyebrows here and there. Today, at the Ubuntu Developer Summit, Mark Shuttleworth held his keynote speech, and in it, he announced that Ubuntu will switch to the Unity user interface come release, for both the netbook as well as the desktop, leaving the GNOME user interface behind (but keeping the GNOME platform).
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RE[7]: Comment by Luminair
by nt_jerkface on Wed 27th Oct 2010 16:01 UTC in reply to "RE[6]: Comment by Luminair"
nt_jerkface
Member since:
2009-08-26


Pick a version target and stick with it. This is why enterprise distros and Debian are good.

That works for a database company targeting a conservative distro like RHEL but a gaming company needs to support the latest version of Ubuntu.


I am arguing about whether GNOME vs KDE vs GNOME+Unity fragmentation is hurting Desktop Linux. It isn't. You still haven't even attempted to describe how it might.

It makes Linux less appealing to ISVs since multiple environments increase development and support costs. Proper Qt integration within Gnome is really what is needed.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[8]: Comment by Luminair
by sorpigal on Wed 27th Oct 2010 17:00 in reply to "RE[7]: Comment by Luminair"
sorpigal Member since:
2005-11-02

A gaming company cares less than most about Qt vs. GTK nonsense, much less the environment. Most games are full-screen affairs that care about the WM and not much else at the DE level.

I put it to you that if gaming companies ported their games to RHEL only then the RHEL versions of libs would find their way on to a lot of people's systems, even if via chroot, and a lot more desktop users would run RHEL.

Granted that multiple desktop environments have a non-zero support and development cost, but I don't know of any case where it's been a deal breaker for a porting effort. Do you?

Proper Qt integration with GNOME will help a lot. What would help even more if writing Qt apps from C were painless. Or, how about a libgtkqt which can act as a run-time drop-in replacement for gtk and actually use Qt? It's not as if emulating an API is a new concept and it would certainly be a nice way to bring a swift end to the toolkit wars.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[9]: Comment by Luminair
by nt_jerkface on Wed 27th Oct 2010 22:16 in reply to "RE[8]: Comment by Luminair"
nt_jerkface Member since:
2009-08-26

A gaming company cares less than most about Qt vs. GTK nonsense, much less the environment. Most games are full-screen affairs that care about the WM and not much else at the DE level.


They still have installation routines and setup dialogs that tie into the system. But the point was more that there are companies who targeted demographic wants to run the latest distro/kernel version for performance and hardware support. I suppose A/V editors would have been a better example. RHEL has a conservative update policy but is getting long in the tooth even for database servers. Perhaps the rolling distros will end up doing more to address this problem.


Granted that multiple desktop environments have a non-zero support and development cost, but I don't know of any case where it's been a deal breaker for a porting effort. Do you?

Well I think it's a combined problem of distro, DE and package format fragmentation. Then you have sound issues as well. An ISV isn't going to point to DE as a deal breaker when it isn't the biggest problem. However I do think it has a role in discouraging ISVs. It makes the Linux desktop look like a work in progress since there isn't a consistent look and feel.

Proper Qt integration with GNOME will help a lot. What would help even more if writing Qt apps from C were painless.

I think a standard package format and installer would provide the most gain from the least amount of work.

Reply Parent Score: 2