Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 29th Oct 2010 20:48 UTC
Microsoft Most websites glossed over this, but we didn't. Silverlight, once touted as Microsoft's answer to Adobe's Flash, has been retooled from its original purpose. Microsoft is betting big on HTML5 instead, turning Silverlight into the development platform for Windows Phone, and that's it. So... Silverlight is dead - long live Silerlight?
Thread beginning with comment 447847
To view parent comment, click here.
To read all comments associated with this story, please click here.
_txf_
Member since:
2008-03-17

Wrong.

It is available for symbian. But while you're at it why not add QNX,BeOS, OS/2.

Just because it was unavailable on certain platforms does not invalidate its (ex-) stated mission to be cross platform. Maybe if the strategy had not changed it would eventually get to those platforms.

Reply Parent Score: 2

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Wrong.

It is available for symbian. But while you're at it why not add QNX,BeOS, OS/2.

Just because it was unavailable on certain platforms does not invalidate its (ex-) stated mission to be cross platform. Maybe if the strategy had not changed it would eventually get to those platforms.


It is not nearly cross-platform enough, that is the problem.

Also, it is a proprietary technology, which makes it totally unsuitable for use as a web standard.

http://www.w3.org/Consortium/Patent-Policy-20040205/

Why write a web technology that can't be used on the web by a hefty percentage of web-connected devices, such as some phones, tablets, smartbooks and netbooks, and even some desktops?

BTW - being a "standard" hasn't anything to do with the bare number of devices that can or cannot use it. A "standard" is meant to enable interoperability across the board for any device from any manufacturer.

Standards are about wide interoperability, not popularity.

"Windows + Mac" just doesn't cut it. Not by a loooooooonnnng shot.

Reply Parent Score: 2

_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17

I doubt that microsoft ever intended to make it a standard. It was always going to be a runtime embedded on a page. If people wanted something more advanced for things like live streaming etc they could use SL. Additions of other platforms would then come as demanded.

If they wanted interoperability with all pcs then they would go someplace else. Either way looking at the development of SL since 2.0 it appears that the narrowed focus has been in effect for a long time.

Edited 2010-10-31 12:15 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Silverlight is not meant to mesh with the web, hence why they made it a browser plugin instead of building it directly into IE. Silverlight is meant to supplement the web in scenarios, but overall, it's meant to serve as a launchpad to an Out of Browser application.

However, to someone like you who has never used Silverlight, beyond your misconception, all ability to communicate and reason is lost.

Reply Parent Score: 4