Linked by Thom Holwerda on Fri 29th Oct 2010 20:48 UTC
Microsoft Most websites glossed over this, but we didn't. Silverlight, once touted as Microsoft's answer to Adobe's Flash, has been retooled from its original purpose. Microsoft is betting big on HTML5 instead, turning Silverlight into the development platform for Windows Phone, and that's it. So... Silverlight is dead - long live Silerlight?
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Nelson
Member since:
2005-11-29

Silverlight is not meant to mesh with the web, hence why they made it a browser plugin instead of building it directly into IE. Silverlight is meant to supplement the web in scenarios, but overall, it's meant to serve as a launchpad to an Out of Browser application.

However, to someone like you who has never used Silverlight, beyond your misconception, all ability to communicate and reason is lost.

Reply Parent Score: 4

lemur2 Member since:
2007-02-17

Silverlight is not meant to mesh with the web, hence why they made it a browser plugin instead of building it directly into IE.


Hardly. They made it a browser plugin rather than building it directly into IE because to do the latter would mean that it would take more than a decade before most people had bought a new Windows PC and so had Silverlight.

As a plugin, people can "plug it in" to their existing Windows installation. Thankfully, people were slow to do so, and Silverlight never gained the level of market penetration required in order to make it saleable to content providers. Too many machines and devices connected to the web have no Silverlight capability installed ... the majority of web-connected devices cannot work with Silverlight but they can work with Flash and now with HTML5/WebM.

That is the fundamental problem with a strategy where one hopes to make it a requirement to use a particular platform and technology in order to view rich web content ... too many devices are not that platform and technology, and content providers will shun your lock-in solution as a consequence.

http://gs.statcounter.com/press
"Microsoft's Internet Explorer browser falls below 50% of worldwide market for first time"

It is and always was a strategy doomed to fail ... as we have seen it fail.

Not a biggy ... bound to happen.

Edited 2010-10-31 22:09 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

_txf_ Member since:
2008-03-17

I suspect that the engineering levels of MS already saw this long ago ( can clearly be seen in the way SL developed in 3.0 and 4.0). Only that the executive levels have only made it public or caught up right now.

Either way I don't see anyone mourning, complaining or even surprised at the announcement both outside MS and inside.

well...possibly..small regret, I would say it would be nice to be able to develop web apps using a c like language for the whole stack. Any alternatives?

Edited 2010-10-31 23:01 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

Nelson Member since:
2005-11-29

Hardly. They made it a browser plugin rather than building it directly into IE because to do the latter would mean that it would take more than a decade before most people had bought a new Windows PC and so had Silverlight.


No. Silverlight works on Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7 on the Windows side of thing. Building it into IE would have meant it got pushed to those three OSes with the next IE iteration (and given that Silverlight was announced at MIX, it would have lined up perfectly with an IE release.)


As a plugin, people can "plug it in" to their existing Windows installation.


Or as an integral part of the web browser, people would get it when they upgraded IE. Seen IE8's adoption rate? Yeah, it wouldn't have been hard.


Thankfully, people were slow to do so, and Silverlight never gained the level of market penetration required in order to make it saleable to content providers.


Silverlight has incredible market penetration and an adoption rate that's very significant. Only bested really by WPF which is nearly ubiquitous on Windows PCs.

You forget that Silverlight is pushed down via Windows Update.


Too many machines and devices connected to the web have no Silverlight capability installed ... the majority of web-connected devices cannot work with Silverlight but they can work with Flash and now with HTML5/WebM.


The HTML5 stuff really varies. A lot of mobile browsers have compatibility with proprietary -webkit- HTML5 feature bits, but beyond that, it's really a mess.

It's really, ironically funny you don't see the insane lock in trap the web has walked into.

Reply Parent Score: 2