Linked by Thom Holwerda on Mon 1st Nov 2010 17:10 UTC
Apple Do you like VLC on your iPhone or iPad? You don't yet have it installed, but want to? Well, then you'd better be quick about it, as some VLC contributors are unhappy with the fact that VLC is distributed through Apple's App Store, violating the GPL the video player is licensed under. At least, that's what some think.
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the 'spirit' of gpl
by Adurbe on Mon 1st Nov 2010 18:01 UTC
Adurbe
Member since:
2005-07-06

I have no problem with the port being included.

According to the gnu.org site GPL explained as this;

Nobody should be restricted by the software they use. There are four freedoms that every user should have:

the freedom to use the software for any purpose,
the freedom to change the software to suit your needs,
the freedom to share the software with your friends and neighbors, and
the freedom to share the changes you make.



I dont think these freedoms are lost by it being on the App Store when the source is available. If the 'legality' of the licence doesnt allow this means of distribution, I would argue its the Licence that is wrong and needs updating.

No licence/law is perfect, it needs to adapt to ensure its goals are upheld in a changing world.

Reply Score: 4

RE: the 'spirit' of gpl
by Thom_Holwerda on Mon 1st Nov 2010 18:03 in reply to "the 'spirit' of gpl"
Thom_Holwerda Member since:
2005-06-29

No licence/law is perfect, it needs to adapt to ensure its goals are upheld in a changing world.


Even when those changes are EXACTLY what your license is supposed to protect from?

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE[2]: the 'spirit' of gpl
by Adurbe on Mon 1st Nov 2010 18:27 in reply to "RE: the 'spirit' of gpl"
Adurbe Member since:
2005-07-06

rather than arguing generalities, what specific area of the App Store terms of service do you think impedes these rights?

I am not a lawyer (in case you hadnt guessed) but my understanding is GPLv3 does not forbid DRM protections on content nor code outright. However it IS giving anyone permission to circumvent them

What I think is the relevant bit of the GPL

3. Protecting Users' Legal Rights From Anti-Circumvention Law.
No covered work shall be deemed part of an effective technological measure under any applicable law fulfilling obligations under article 11 of the WIPO copyright treaty adopted on 20 December 1996, or similar laws prohibiting or restricting circumvention of such measures.

When you convey a covered work, you waive any legal power to forbid circumvention of technological measures to the extent such circumvention is effected by exercising rights under this License with respect to the covered work, and you disclaim any intention to limit operation or modification of the work as a means of enforcing, against the work's users, your or third parties' legal rights to forbid circumvention of technological measures.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: the 'spirit' of gpl
by Valhalla on Mon 1st Nov 2010 18:09 in reply to "the 'spirit' of gpl"
Valhalla Member since:
2006-01-24

If the 'legality' of the licence doesnt allow this means of distribution, I would argue its the Licence that is wrong and needs updating.

A licence that exists to protect rights of end users should change to accomodate a locked-in environment which places huge restrictions on end users? Are you serious?

Reply Parent Score: 6

RE[2]: the 'spirit' of gpl
by Adurbe on Mon 1st Nov 2010 18:34 in reply to "RE: the 'spirit' of gpl"
Adurbe Member since:
2005-07-06

What right have you lost by it being included on the store?

I appreciate Apple's store in unpopular in certain quarters, for a host of reasons, but I genuinely dont see where its restrictions are relevant to the aims of GPL licence.

Reply Parent Score: 2

RE: the 'spirit' of gpl
by mrhasbean on Mon 1st Nov 2010 23:30 in reply to "the 'spirit' of gpl"
mrhasbean Member since:
2006-04-03

Each time you redistribute the Program (or any work based on the Program), the recipient automatically receives a license from the original licensor to copy, distribute or modify the Program subject to these terms and conditions. You may not impose any further restrictions on the recipients' exercise of the rights granted herein.


OK, so let me get this right. Apple change their terms to allow GPL apps but because they're restricting the end user from redistributing the binary which anyone else can obtain for free from the iTunes store anyway this is grounds to challenge the whole thing? Sounds like geeks being wankers for the sake of being wankers.

Reply Parent Score: 3