Linked by Thom Holwerda on Tue 2nd Nov 2010 18:00 UTC
Amiga & AROS Always wanted to own the IP and trademarks of one of the most innovative computer brands in history? A brand carried by a computer which was easily ten years ahead of its time, capable of multitasking (in colour) with multiple resolutions displayed at the same time, while Windows were still windows and the Mac couldn't hold more than 8 pages in its word processor on its single-tasking monochrome operating system? Yes, Bill McEwen's Amiga, Inc. is selling the Amiga trademark and all associated IP. It's not like the guy was doing anything with it anyway.
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Raffaele
Member since:
2005-11-12

What did the Amiga represent in 1985? it represented a quantum leap in what computers could do.

[cut]

Nowadays, that computers has progressed so far, there is no point in doing a machine named 'Amiga' with the same technology currently available for PCs or Macs. We already have PCs or Macs, thank you. We need something more exciting.

[cut]

Otherwise, there is no point in the name 'Amiga' any more.


Nowadays Amiga is more or less its OS, AmigaOS.

People who are tired of Windows or the complexity of Linux, or by the fact that MacOS threaten the user as stupid bimbos uncapable to grow, could be excited and enjoyed by AmigaOS if only they could try it once.

Major benefits of AmigaOS are:

- Higly responsive, even on low performance processors (Interface rensponds quickly even if OS is occupied in various activities)

- Extremely fast even on low performant hardware

- No resource consuming either on low or high pumped hardware

- Entiery customizable by the user

- Always obeys the order of the user and does not try to overcome his human master performing unwanted activities

- Extremely organized (any file has its own precise place, so even the newbie user could restore with ease even damaged or deleted system files)

- Easy to learn by new users

- Human understandable filesytem organization (any directory and files have long and precise names indicating what is its task job, so the average Joe User will not being lost in a ierarchy of unknown directories or being ashamed by the silly cryptic dungeon of strange-named files that characterizing other OSes like Windows and Linux)

- The AmigaOS has usually a fixed low number of system files, and not the thousand ones of Windows, Linux and MacOSX... so the user will be not lost in an intricate maze of files, that in 90% of the times are useless for the common installation of the OS.

- Easy to inspect and manage what the OS and the software are doing with common utilities like "Scout".

In the recent past AmigaOS has achieved protected memory and swap memory.

RAM is defragmented on the fly by a modern algorithm.

It has modern features like GPU Accelerated Graphics and enhanced by libraries like Cairo.

Now it is to be enhanced soon by SMP (Simmetrical Multi Processing) to run on multicore processors, and graphical system will be rewritten including engines like Gallium3D.

AmigaOS is rapidly catching again the mainstream.

There is people who would kill to have all these features on a single OS, and sure there are a very vaste people who would pay more than the 99 US Dollars of the cost of AmigaOS due to all these features, because it is worth the entire price it costs!

Edited 2010-11-03 12:37 UTC

Reply Parent Score: 2

tylerdurden Member since:
2009-03-17

"
There is people who would kill to have all these features on a single OS, and sure there are a very vaste people who would pay more than the 99 US Dollars of the cost of AmigaOS due to all these features, because it is worth the entire price it costs! "

Given that Morphos world wide user base is in the 3 figure range, reality begs to differ from your own subjective opinion.

BTW, all the "pros" you give are very subjective qualitative estimations. Which ironically I have read in different form applied as pros for the other OSs you were comparing against. Which is why qualitative arguments are flawed when it comes to be passed as technical fact.

And I say this as a morphos user (I have a copy running in a mac mini), and sorry to say but in my own personal assessment the value proposition for that OS is no where near being worth the $100 bucks they charge for it...

Reply Parent Score: 2

Raffaele Member since:
2005-11-12

And I say this as a morphos user (I have a copy running in a mac mini), and sorry to say but in my own personal assessment the value proposition for that OS is no where near being worth the $100 bucks they charge for it...


I am a MorphOS user too...

What flaws are you complaining about the OS?

Reply Parent Score: 2

axilmar Member since:
2006-03-20

It's debatable how all the things you say are truly a major benefit. They are certainly not the quantum leap the Amiga was in 1985.

I also doubt there are many people interested, as you claim. There are perhaps a few thousand computer geeks that may like that, but the general public will be largely indifferent to all that.

Reply Parent Score: 2